balsam

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balsam

a fragrant resin exuded from certain trees; any of various plants belonging to the genus Impatiens; any agency that heals, soothes, or restores: the balsam of kindness
Not to be confused with:
balsa – a tropical American tree of the bombax family, yielding a very light wood used for rafts and toys: The toy airplane was made of balsa wood.

bal·sam

(bôl′səm)
n.
1.
a. Any of several aromatic resins, such as balsam of Peru and balsam of Tolu, that contain considerable amounts of benzoic acid, cinnamic acid, or both, or their esters.
b. Any of several other fragrant plant resins, such as Canada balsam.
c. A similar substance, especially a fragrant ointment used as medication; a balm.
2. Any of various trees, especially the balsam fir, yielding an aromatic resinous substance.
3. See impatiens.

[Latin balsamum, balm of Gilead, from Greek balsamon, of Semitic origin; see bśm in the Appendix of Semitic roots.]

balsam

(ˈbɔːlsəm)
n
1. (Plants) any of various fragrant oleoresins, such as balm or tolu, obtained from any of several trees and shrubs and used as a base for medicines and perfumes
2. (Plants) any of various similar substances used as medicinal or ceremonial ointments
3. (Plants) any of certain aromatic resinous turpentines. See also Canada balsam
4. (Plants) any plant yielding balsam
5. (Plants) Also called: busy Lizzie any of several balsaminaceous plants of the genus Impatiens, esp I. balsamina, cultivated for its brightly coloured flowers
6. anything healing or soothing
[C15: from Latin balsamum, from Greek balsamon, from Hebrew bāśām spice]
balsamic adj
ˈbalsamy adj

bal•sam

(ˈbɔl səm)

n.
1. any of various fragrant resins exuded from certain trees, esp. trees of the genus Commiphora, as balm-of-Gilead. Compare balm (def. 1).
3. any of various trees yielding a balsam, esp. the balsam fir.
4. any of several plants belonging to the genus Impatiens, as I. balsamina, a common garden annual.
5. any aromatic ointment for ceremonial or medicinal use.
[before 1000; Middle English balsamum, Old English balzaman < Latin balsamum < Greek bálsamon < Semitic (compare Hebrew bāshām)]
bal•sam•ic (bɔlˈsæm ɪk) adj.

balsam

- First referred to an aromatic resinous substance with healing or soothing properties.
See also related terms for healing.

balm, balsam - Greek balsamon is the source of both balm and balsam; it was an oily resin of various trees and shrubs.
See also related terms for shrubs.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.balsam - any seed plant yielding balsambalsam - any seed plant yielding balsam  
phanerogam, seed plant, spermatophyte - plant that reproduces by means of seeds not spores
balsam - any of various fragrant oleoresins used in medicines and perfumes
2.balsam - any of various fragrant oleoresins used in medicines and perfumes
balsam - any seed plant yielding balsam
balsam of tolu, tolu, tolu balsam - aromatic yellowish brown balsam from the tolu balsam tree used especially in cough syrups
oleoresin - a naturally occurring mixture of a resin and an essential oil; obtained from certain plants
balm - any of various aromatic resinous substances used for healing and soothing
3.balsam - an ointment containing a fragrant resinbalsam - an ointment containing a fragrant resin
ointment, salve, unguent, balm, unction - semisolid preparation (usually containing a medicine) applied externally as a remedy or for soothing an irritation
Translations
بَلْسَم، دَواء، مُرَطِّب
balzám
balsambalsamin
BalsamSpringkraut
צרי
ilmkvoîa
ホウセンカ鳳仙花
balzams
niecierpek
balsam

balsam

[ˈbɔːlsəm] Nbálsamo m

balsam

[ˈbɔːlsəm] n
(= oil) → baume m
(= tree, shrub) → balsamier m

balsam

n
Balsam m
(Bot) → Springkraut nt

balsam

[ˈbɔːlsəm] nbalsamo

balsam

(ˈboːlsəm) noun
a pleasant-smelling substance obtained from certain trees. He inhaled balsam when he had a bad cold.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Scottish Invasive Species Initiative (SISI) team uprooted the Himalayan balsam from the banks of the River Deveron, near Turriff, as part of ongoing efforts to rid northern Scotland's fresh waterways from animals and plants that are not native to this country.
The Scottish Invasive Species Initiative (SISI) team uprooted the Himalayan balsam from the banks of the River Deveron near Turriff, as part of ongoing efforts to rid northern Scotland's fresh waterways from animals and plants that are not native to this country.
Himalayan Balsam is an invasive non-native species, which mainly grows along river banks and in damp woodland.
The app allows people to record sightings of wildlife or invasive species such as Himalayan balsam or Japanese knotweed, which damage riverbanks.
Volunteers have been working to pull up the Himalayan Balsam in the county as part of the Shropshire Wildlife Trust's river project.
Steve and Heather Bond, from Pant Glas, said a field close to their home, is now over-run with Himalayan Balsam plants.
My argument is that, before Himalayan balsam, we had carpets of wild flowers which both domesticated and wild bees love.
Dear Editor Invasive nonnative species, (giant hogweed and himalayan balsam being just two examples), are running rampant throughout the area with little action being taken to control them by those who have the authority and power.
But the Scottish Environmental Protection Agency (SEPA) say the presence of Japanese knotweed, Himalayan balsam and giant hogweed is hindering those efforts.
Working with the SNPA, Snowdonia Society volunteers have successfully cleared several sites of Himalayan balsam.
In June and July, swathes of Himalayan Balsam were pulled out from the banks to stop this invasive species from setting seed and spreading further and volunteers have been collecting water samples to record the number and type of species present.
For further details and to take part contact: 07437 747402 or email: archaeologycymru@live.co.uk | |Friends of Hailey Park will be out in the park tomorrow, June 11, 2pm-5pm, pulling up Himalayan balsam. This is a non-native, invasive plant, which was introduced to the UK in the 19th century.