Hindenburg line


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Hindenburg line

(ˈhɪndənˌbɜːɡ)
n
(Historical Terms) a line of strong fortifications built by the German army near the Franco-Belgian border in 1916–17: breached by the Allies in August 1918
[C20: named after Paul von Hindenburg]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Sgt James (Jim) Whitworth of 5th Battalion the Leicestershire Regiment was part of the force that broke through the Hindenburg line and crossed the St.Quentin canal at the end of September 1918.
On September 29, 1918, the Allies breached one of the strongest sections of the Hindenburg Line - which formed the German defences - and by early October had completely broken through.
The next spring, his unit saw action during the German retreat to the hindenburg Line and the battle of Arras, where John died from what was described in news reports as a stray shell.he is buried at Tilloy british Cemetery in Tilloy-Les-Mofflaines.
It was also towards the end of September that 4th Army crashed through the Hindenburg Line, the seemingly inexpugnable bastion of German hopes.
The St Quentin Canal formed an immense, ready-made anti-tank ditch with the main Hindenburg Line trench system to the east.
The men crossed the St Quentin Canal (part of the Hindenburg line) in lifebelts
"During a bombing attack on the Hindenburg line, he volunteered to be leading bomber, and then led the party over the open.
The crossing of the St Quentin Canal at Riqueval finally broke the German defensive position known by the British as the Hindenburg Line and by the Germans as the Siegfried Line.
2nd Ypres, Verdun, the Somme and Passchendaele get a mention but the decisive battles that ended the war, the French counteroffensive in July and the British victories at Amiens and the Hindenburg Line do not feature.
Trenches during this time were still dug; but with movement as large and as fast as occurred during the Hundred Days, field defences were quick and expedient and lacked the sophisticated depth of the Somme or the Hindenburg Line. By keeping up the pressure, the break in was not the bloodbath it was at the Somme.