Hipparchus


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Related to Hipparchus: Ptolemy

Hip·par·chus

 (hĭ-pär′kəs) fl. second century bc.
Greek astronomer who discovered the precession of the equinoxes, developed the techniques of trigonometry, and catalogued the positions of 850 stars in the earliest known star chart.

Hipparchus

(hɪˈpɑːkəs)
n
1. (Biography) 2nd century bc, Greek astronomer. He discovered the precession of the equinoxes, calculated the length of the solar year, and developed trigonometry
2. (Biography) died 514 bc, tyrant of Athens (527–514)

Hipparchus

(hɪˈpɑːkəs)
n
(Astronomy) a large crater in the SW quadrant of the moon, about 130 kilometres in diameter

Hip•par•chus

(hɪˈpɑr kəs)

n.
1. died 514 B.C., tyrant of Athens 527–514.
2. c190–c125 B.C., Greek astronomer.

Hip·par·chus

(hĭ-pär′kəs)
Second century b.c. Greek astronomer who mapped the position of 850 stars in the earliest known star chart. His observations of the heavens formed the basis of Ptolemy's Earth-centered model of the universe.
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Noun1.Hipparchus - Greek astronomer and mathematician who discovered the precession of the equinoxes and made the first known star chart and is said to have invented trigonometry (second century BC)
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References in periodicals archive ?
These led Schaefer to calculate how much the sky has shifted due to Earth's wobble of precession (one of Hipparchus's own discoveries).
Hipparchus (150 km wide) is a heavily damaged version of Ptolemaeus, with a large floor and rim cut by Imbrium ejecta.
The manuscript was a pretelescopic catalog of more than 1,000 stars, with their positions determined with an average error of only about a half arcminute--eight times more precise than the observations that Ptolemy and Hipparchus had made 1,400 years earlier.
The distance to the Moon was known fairly accurately as far back as the time of Hipparchus, in the 2nd century B.C., and the distance to the Sun and the other planets was determined to within an error of 10 percent by Gian Cassini and Jean Richer in 1672.
Informing the movement from certainty to uncertainty is an emphasis on eccentricity over uniformity, as with the presentation of the 2nd century BC Greek astrologer, astronomer, geographer, and mathematician Hipparchus, who not only devised the first star map by calculating the positions of hundreds of stars, but also figured out that the orbiting motion of the moon is irregular, not uniform as many of his predecessors thought (Gregersen 2010, 115-6).
Harmodius and Aristogeiton were worshipped as demigods in Athens after slaying the tyrant Hipparchus in an apparent personal dispute.
I didn't back Four Ten but in one of the other races I had a shilling (5p) on Hipparchus, which won at odds of 100-1.
(47) Plato's Hipparchus (individual profits) and Republic Books I-II (non-interference from the state) discuss two seminal threads in favor of the market; see Plato: Complete Works, trans.
Aristogeiton's assassination of Hipparchus, Thucydidis Historiae,
"This is a rare example of the ancient world teaching us something new." Until now, Greek astronomer Hipparchus, who lived around 120BC, was regarded as the father of trigonometry.
The next section is a note about Hipparchus' discovery of a new star in 134 BC, which made him realise that stars were impermanent entities capable of appearing and disappearing.
They were invented between the second century BC (generally attributed to Hipparchus) or later, closer to the fourth century AD, and became ever more elaborate and complex as the geometry of the projections was refined.