sclerosis

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Related to Hippocampal sclerosis: temporal lobe epilepsy

scle·ro·sis

 (sklə-rō′sĭs)
n. pl. scle·ro·ses (-sēz)
1.
a. A thickening or hardening of a body part, as of an artery, especially from excessive formation of fibrous interstitial tissue.
b. A disease characterized by this thickening or hardening.
2. Botany The hardening of cells by the formation of a secondary wall and the deposition of lignin.

[Middle English sclirosis, from Medieval Latin sclīrōsis, from Greek sklērōsis, hardening, from sklēroun, to harden; see scleroma.]

sclerosis

(sklɪəˈrəʊsɪs)
n, pl -ses (-siːz)
1. (Pathology) pathol a hardening or thickening of organs, tissues, or vessels from chronic inflammation, abnormal growth of fibrous tissue, or degeneration of the myelin sheath of nerve fibres, or (esp on the inner walls of arteries) deposition of fatty plaques. Compare arteriosclerosis, atherosclerosis, multiple sclerosis
2. (Botany) the hardening of a plant cell wall or tissue by the deposition of lignin
3. a debilitating lack of progress or innovation within an institution or organization
[C14: via Medieval Latin from Greek sklērōsis a hardening]
scleˈrosal adj

scle•ro•sis

(sklɪˈroʊ sɪs)

n., pl. -ses (-sēz).
1. a hardening of a body tissue or part, or an increase of connective tissue or the like at the expense of more active tissue.
2. a hardening of a plant tissue or cell wall by thickening or becoming woody.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Medieval Latin < Greek sklḗrōsis hardening = sklērō-, variant s. of skleroûn to harden, v. derivative of sklērós hard + -sis -sis]
scle•ro′sal, adj.

sclerosis

a hardening of body tissues or other parts, as by an excessive growth of fibrous connective tissue. See also plantssclerotic, adj.
See also: Disease and Illness
a hardening of body tissues or other parts, as by an excessive growth of fibrous connective tissue. See also plants. — sclerotic, adj.
See also: Body, Human
the hardening of the cell wall of a plant, as by the formation of wood. See also body, human. — sclerotic, adj.
See also: Plants
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sclerosis - any pathological hardening or thickening of tissue
disseminated multiple sclerosis, disseminated sclerosis, MS, multiple sclerosis - a chronic progressive nervous disorder involving loss of myelin sheath around certain nerve fibers
ALS, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Lou Gehrig's disease - thickening of tissue in the motor tracts of the lateral columns and anterior horns of the spinal cord; results in progressive muscle atrophy that starts in the limbs
arteriolosclerosis - sclerosis of the arterioles
osteosclerosis - abnormal hardening or eburnation of bone
pathology - any deviation from a healthy or normal condition
Translations

sclerosis

[sklɪˈrəʊsɪs] N (scleroses (pl)) [sklɪˈrəʊsiːz] (Med) → esclerosis f
see also multiple C

sclerosis

[skləˈrəʊsɪs] nsclérose f multiple sclerosis

sclerosis

sclerosis

[sklɪˈrəʊsɪs] n (Med) → sclerosi f

scle·ro·sis

n. esclerosis, endurecimiento progresivo de los tejidos y órganos;
Alzheimer's ______ de Alzheimer;
amyotrophic lateral ______ lateral amiotrófica;
arterial ______ arterial;
multiple ______ múltiple.

sclerosis

n esclerosis f; amyotrophic lateral — esclerosis lateral amiotrófica; multiple — esclerosis múltiple; progressive systemic — esclerosis sistémica progresiva; tuberous — esclerosis tuberosa
References in periodicals archive ?
While they don't have definite answers, besides having good genes, Kawas said, the answer is probably a combination of being resilient to Alzheimer's Disease and also that they did not develop other dementia-causing conditions, such as microscopic infarctions that occur when blood flow is blocked from certain regions of the brain and hippocampal sclerosis, which causes neuron loss.
Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) is a form of intractable epilepsy that may highly benefit from surgery in which hippocampal sclerosis (HS) is the most frequent pathological substrate.
Prognosis of patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy due to hippocampal sclerosis.
Hippocampal sclerosis (HS) is a common, but underappreciated, pathologic finding associated with aging and dementia, also referred to as hippocampal sclerosis of aging (HS-aging), hippocampal sclerosis dementia, (9-11) and hippocampal sclerosis of the elderly.
It is still debated whether IHI contributes to the hippocampal insult, thus triggering the development of seizures or hippocampal sclerosis.
Recent research suggests, however, that other pathologies linked with dementia--such as Lewy bodies (abnormal deposits of a protein inside brain cells), hippocampal sclerosis (a severe loss of brain cells in a key memory region called the hippocampus), microinfarcts (small mini-strokes) and low brain weight--are also commonly present in the brains of individuals with dementia.
An A+/T-/N+ profile might indicate an individual in the earliest stage of preclinical AD (accounting for the A+/T- status), who also has a non-AD pathology such as hippocampal sclerosis (accounting for the N+ status).
Subjects with a history of CNS infection, head trauma, brain tumor, cerebrovascular lesion, pseudoattacks, neurodegenerative and psychiatric disease, hippocampal sclerosis, cortical dysplasia and nonprogressive tumors and perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy were excluded.
MRI identifies structural defects that require urgent treatment such as high-grade gliomas and arteriovenous malformations, subtle structural abnormalities such as Hippocampal sclerosis and malformations of cortical development.
Charlotte said: "Billy has now developed Hippocampal sclerosis which is basically the loss of cells in the brain caused by scarring after seizures.
Hippocampal sclerosis (HS), which is characterized by severe neuronal loss and gliosis in the hippocampus, is the prominent histopathological finding in TLE.
They included AD, Lewy bodies, hippocampal sclerosis, microinfarcts, and low brain weight (see box, following page).