Hippolytus


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Hip·pol·y·tus

 (hĭ-pŏl′ĭ-təs)
n. Greek Mythology
A son of Hippolyta and Theseus who was killed by Poseidon.

Hippolytus

(hɪˈpɒlɪtəs)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth a son of Theseus, killed after his stepmother Phaedra falsely accused him of raping her
Hipˈpolytan adj

Hip•pol•y•tus

(hɪˈpɒl ɪ təs)

n.
(in Greek myth) the son of Theseus who, having been falsely accused by his stepmother, Phaedra, of raping her, was killed by Poseidon.
Translations

Hippolytus

[hɪˈpɒlɪtəs] NHipólito

Hippolytus

[hɪˈpɒlɪtəs] nIppolito
References in classic literature ?
The lackeys on their part, like the coursers of Hippolytus, shared the sadness of their masters.
She looks at EuripidesAE Hippolytus and scholarly interpretations of the tragedy in the 19th and 20th centuries; the late Hellenistic phenomenon of the rise of oprivateo or ovoluntaryo associations; the central church of the 14th century Vlatadon monastery in the upper, old city of Thessaloniki; and the concept of tradition within the context of re-creating the traditional Greek village in modern Greece as a way to display or perform modern Greekness.
430 BC) (71-82); Hippolytus (428 BC) (83-102); Andromache (ca.
The Antigone production, just like the Hippolytus play last year, was staged under the auspices of the committee in question.
In Euripides's tragedy, Phaedra hangs herself in despair after Aphrodite causes her to become infatuated with Hippolytus, Theseus's son, who is subsequently banished and finally trampled by a monstrous bull.
Hippolytus says the generation of the heavens follows from this same motion (Hippolytus, Refutation of All Heresies, 1.
Once or twice Azoulay also appears to claim too much on the basis of too little as when, for example, in note 27 of chapter three he cites only a six-line conversation between a prince and his slave in the fictional Hippolytus by Euripides as evidence that public opinion in the fifth century held solemnity to be anti-democratic.
The development of the idea that the Holy Family traveled widely in Egypt was greatly helped by the statement by the prolific early third-century theologian Hippolytus of Rome, that Jesus had stayed in Egypt for three and a half years as a child.
She finds evidence of these notions in expressions of both rational and irrational thought: on the one hand in the tragedian's Medea and Hippolytus and, on the other hand, in two sections of Dialoghi con Letico.
Unfortunately, he angered Zeus when he accepted payment for raising a man called Hippolytus.
For example, the authors point out that in being completely devoted to the virgin goddess Artemis (a personification of asexuality), the Greek god Hippolytus cut himself off from both the erotic and romantic aspects of love (personified by Aphrodite).
Where then does this place the thrice-marriedJohn Milton, whose so-called misogyny is often associated with Euripides's and who adapted the words of Euripides's Hippolytus and Jason for the Chorus's words in Samson Agonistes and for Adam's famous denunciation of females in Paradise Lost 10.