Hippolytus


Also found in: Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Hip·pol·y·tus

 (hĭ-pŏl′ĭ-təs)
n. Greek Mythology
A son of Hippolyta and Theseus who was killed by Poseidon.

Hippolytus

(hɪˈpɒlɪtəs)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth a son of Theseus, killed after his stepmother Phaedra falsely accused him of raping her
Hipˈpolytan adj

Hip•pol•y•tus

(hɪˈpɒl ɪ təs)

n.
(in Greek myth) the son of Theseus who, having been falsely accused by his stepmother, Phaedra, of raping her, was killed by Poseidon.
Translations

Hippolytus

[hɪˈpɒlɪtəs] NHipólito

Hippolytus

[hɪˈpɒlɪtəs] nIppolito
References in classic literature ?
The lackeys on their part, like the coursers of Hippolytus, shared the sadness of their masters.
The Spanish Maltravieso Teatro and La Almena Producciones are up next with Hippolytus on July 8 at Paphos' Odeon and at Skali on July 10.
He was joined by branch chairman Hippolytus Omondi, treasurer Zabbedy Oriwo and a number of the branch executive committee members.
His Royal Highness also visited Hippolytus Hall in Madaba, which is adorned with mosaics and features artefacts from the Roman, Byzantine, Umayyad and other eras.
D.'s translation of Euripides' Hippolytus, untranslatable women: Laura Riding's classical modernist fiction, and Ireland's Oedipus and the modernism of W.
For the baptism of Jesus, Saint Hippolytus said, 'no river is good except the Jordan.' And, 'just as Joshua had entered the Promised Land by crossing the Jordan, Jesus opened the way to heaven by entering and dividing the same waters,' declared Saint Gregory of Nyssa.
Somewhat dustier are the myth-mosaics in the nearby Hippolytus Hall.
430 BC) (71-82); Hippolytus (428 BC) (83-102); Andromache (ca.
In Euripides's tragedy, Phaedra hangs herself in despair after Aphrodite causes her to become infatuated with Hippolytus, Theseus's son, who is subsequently banished and finally trampled by a monstrous bull.
Through the centuries, many have done so, for example: Maria Goretti; Ignatius of Antioch; Perpetua and Felicity; Agatha; Hippolytus; Thomas More; Charles Lwanga, Joseph Mukasa, Andrew Kaggwa and the other Catholic and Anglican men and boys who were burned alive for their faith by the king of Buganda; Lawrence and six other deacons under Emperor Valerian; Symphorosa and her seven children under Hadrian; Maximilian Kolbe and all who died in the Holocaust; all who continue to be persecuted and murdered in Africa and Asia simply because they are Christian.
Once or twice Azoulay also appears to claim too much on the basis of too little as when, for example, in note 27 of chapter three he cites only a six-line conversation between a prince and his slave in the fictional Hippolytus by Euripides as evidence that public opinion in the fifth century held solemnity to be anti-democratic.
The development of the idea that the Holy Family traveled widely in Egypt was greatly helped by the statement by the prolific early third-century theologian Hippolytus of Rome, that Jesus had stayed in Egypt for three and a half years as a child.