historian

(redirected from Historians)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to Historians: ancient historians

his·to·ri·an

 (hĭ-stôr′ē-ən, -stŏr′-)
n.
1. A scholar or writer of history.
2. One who writes or compiles a chronological record of events; a chronicler.

historian

(hɪˈstɔːrɪən)
n
(Historical Terms) a person who writes or studies history, esp one who is an authority on it

his•to•ri•an

(hɪˈstɔr i ən, -ˈstoʊr-)

n.
1. an expert in or authority on history.
2. a writer of history; chronicler.
[1400–50]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.historian - a person who is an authority on history and who studies it and writes about ithistorian - a person who is an authority on history and who studies it and writes about it
history - the discipline that records and interprets past events involving human beings; "he teaches Medieval history"; "history takes the long view"
annalist - a historian who writes annals
art historian - a historian of art
chronicler - someone who writes chronicles
bookman, scholar, scholarly person, student - a learned person (especially in the humanities); someone who by long study has gained mastery in one or more disciplines

historian

noun chronicler, recorder, biographer, antiquarian, historiographer, annalist, chronologist She will become the family historian.
Quotations
"Historians are left forever chasing shadows, painfully aware of their inability ever to reconstruct a dead world in its completeness" [Simon Schama Dead Certainties]
"History repeats itself. Historians repeat each other" [Philip Guedalla Supers and Supermen]
Translations
مُؤَرِّخمُؤرِّخ
historik-čka
historiker
historiantutkijahistorioitsija
povjesničarpovjesničarka
történésztörténetíró
sagnfræîingur
歴史家
역사가
historik
zgodovinar
historiker
นักประวัติศาสตร์
sử gia

historian

[hɪsˈtɔːrɪən] Nhistoriador(a) m/f

historian

[hɪˈstɔːriən] nhistorien(ne) m/f

historian

nHistoriker(in) m(f); (in ancient times) → Geschichtsschreiber(in) m(f)

historian

[hɪsˈtɔːrɪən] nstorico/a

history

(ˈhistəri) plural ˈhistories noun
1. the study of events etc that happened in the past. She is studying British history; (also adjective) a history lesson/book.
2. a description usually in writing of past events, ways of life etc. I'm writing a history of Scotland.
3. (the description of) the usually interesting events etc associated with (something). This desk/word has a very interesting history.
hiˈstorian (-ˈstoː-) noun
a person who studies (and writes about) history.
hiˈstoric (-ˈsto-) adjective
famous or important in history. a historic battle.
hiˈstorical (-ˈsto-) adjective
1. of or about history; of or about people or events from history. historical research; historical novels.
2. that actually happened or existed, not legendary or mythical. Was Shakespeare's character Macbeth a historical person?
hiˈstorically (-ˈsto-) adverb
make history
to do something very important, especially to be the first to do something. The Wright brothers made history when they were the first to fly an aeroplane.

historian

مُؤرِّخ historik historiker Historiker ιστορικός historiador historiantutkija historien povjesničar storico 歴史家 역사가 historicus historiker historyk historiador историк historiker นักประวัติศาสตร์ tarihçi sử gia 历史学家
References in classic literature ?
He is as right as other historians who look for the explanation of historic events in the will of one man; he is as right as the Russian historians who maintain that Napoleon was drawn to Moscow by the skill of the Russian commanders.
The medieval chroniclers were mostly mere annalists, brief mechanical recorders of external events, and the few more philosophic historians of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries do not attain the first rank.
By intellectual processes he realizes and partly visualizes the past, with its dramatic scenes and moments, but he cannot throw himself into it (even if the material afforded by his authorities had permitted) with the passionate vivifying sympathy of later, romantic, historians.
He was for several years a captain in the English militia and later a member of Parliament and one of the Lords of Trade; all which positions were of course practically useful to him as a historian.
For as this is the liquor of modern historians, nay, perhaps their muse, if we may believe the opinion of Butler, who attributes inspiration to ale, it ought likewise to be the potation of their readers, since every book ought to be read with the same spirit and in the same manner as it is writ.
That our work, therefore, might be in no danger of being likened to the labours of these historians, we have taken every occasion of interspersing through the whole sundry similes, descriptions, and other kind of poetical embellishments.
Weitbrecht-Rotholz belongs to that school of historians which believes that human nature is not only about as bad as it can be, but a great deal worse; and certainly the reader is safer of entertainment in their hands than in those of the writers who take a malicious pleasure in representing the great figures of romance as patterns of the domestic virtues.
In due course a legend arose of such circumstantiality that the wise historian would hesitate to attack it.
But, writing as a Historian, he has identified himself(perhaps too closely) with the views generally adopted by Flatland, and (as he has been informed) even by Spaceland, Historians; in whose pages (until very recent times) the destinies of Women and of the masses of mankind have seldom been deemed worthy of mention and never of careful consideration.
Through the kindness of Dorothy Gale of Kansas, afterward Princess Dorothy of Oz, an humble writer in the United States of America was once appointed Royal Historian of Oz, with the privilege of writing the chronicle of that wonderful fairyland.
The children who had learned to look for the books about Oz and who loved the stories about the gay and happy people inhabiting that favored country, were as sorry as their Historian that there would be no more books of Oz stories.
That seemed a good idea; so the Historian rigged up a high tower in his back yard, and took lessons in wireless telegraphy until he understood it, and then began to call "Princess Dorothy of Oz" by sending messages into the air.