historical linguistics

(redirected from Historical-comparative linguistics)
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historical linguistics

n. (used with a sing. verb)
The study of linguistic change over time in language or in a particular language or language family, sometimes including the reconstruction of unattested forms of earlier stages of a language. Also called philology.

historical linguistics

n
(Linguistics) (functioning as singular) the study of language as it changes in the course of time, with a view either to discovering general principles of linguistic change or to establishing the correct genealogical classification of particular languages. Also called: diachronic linguistics Compare descriptive linguistics

historical linguistics

The study of the changes in a language over a period of time.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.historical linguistics - the study of linguistic change; "the synchrony and diachrony of language"
linguistics - the scientific study of language
sound law - a law describing sound changes in the history of a language
deriving, etymologizing, derivation - (historical linguistics) an explanation of the historical origins of a word or phrase
Translations
Historische Sprachwissenschaft
References in periodicals archive ?
Special attention is paid to the theory and practice of lexically based historical-comparative linguistics. The genetic relationship of Koguryo to Japanese is shown to be secure, unlike the non-relationship of either language to Korean or 'Altaic,' and much light is shed on the ethnolinguistic origins of Japanese.
To clarify this issue, note that the main difference between Uralic in the classical sense (meaning historical-comparative linguistics with an emphasis on Uralic languages) and general linguistics lies in the s e l e c t i o n of examined languages: Uralistic focuses on a language group that is considered to be genetically related, its member languages and their historical predecessors.
After decades of rapid progress, historical-comparative linguistics went into a period of crisis in the 1860s (Jankowsky, pp.

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