HIV

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Related to Hiv antigens: Cancer Antigens, P24 antigen test

HIV

 (āch′ī-vē′)
n.
A retrovirus of the genus Lentivirus that causes AIDS by infecting helper T cells of the immune system. The most common serotype, HIV-1, is distributed worldwide, while HIV-2 is primarily confined to West Africa.

[h(uman) i(mmunodeficiency) v(irus).]

HIV

abbreviation for
(Pathology) human immunodeficiency virus; the cause of AIDS. Two strains have been identified: HIV-1 and HIV-2

HIV


n.
a variable retrovirus that invades and inactivates helper T cells of the immune system and is the cause of AIDS.
[1985–90; h(uman) i(mmunodeficiency) v(irus)]

HIV

(āch′ī-vē′)
Short for human immunodeficiency virus. The virus that causes AIDS by infecting the body's immune system.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.HIV - infection by the human immunodeficiency virusHIV - infection by the human immunodeficiency virus
viral infection, virus infection - infection by a virus that is pathogenic to humans
2.HIV - the virus that causes acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS); it replicates in and kills the helper T cells
retrovirus - any of a group of viruses that contain two single-strand linear RNA molecules per virion and reverse transcriptase (RNA to DNA); the virus transcribes its RNA into a cDNA provirus that is then incorporated into the host cell
Translations
فيروس فقدان المناعه: الأيدْز
HIV
hiv
HIVHI-virus
HIV-vírus
ŽIV
UKIMWIvirus vinavyosababishaVVU

HIV

A. N ABBR =human immunodeficiency virusVIH m
HIV positive/negativeVIH positivo/negativo
B. CPD HIV virus Nvirus m VIH

HIV

[ˌeɪtʃaɪˈviː] (=human immunodeficiency virus)
nVIH m, HIV m
modif [infection] → par le VIH; [test, testing] → pour le VIH
the HIV virus → le virus VIH HIV-negative, HIV-positive

HIV

abbr of human immunodeficiency virusHIV nt; HIV positive/negativeHIV-positiv/-negativ

HIV

[ˌeɪtʃaɪˈviː] n abbr =human immunodeficiency virusHIV m inv

HIV

(ˌeitʃ ai ˈviː) abbreviation
human immunodeficiency virus; a virus that causes AIDS.

HIV

abbr human immunodeficiency virus. V. virus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Recently, there has been heightened focus on novel delivery systems for HIV antigens. Researchers are working with different combinations of vaccinations to test prime-boosting strategies with the goal of augmenting the HIV-specific immune response.
INSERM-ANRS and the BIIR have developed innovative approaches for HIV vaccines targeting HIV antigens to dendritic cells (DC) using monoclonal antibodies fused to HIV antigens.
In an ELISA diagnostic test, a patient's serum is diluted and applied to a plate to which HIV antigens are attached.
SIV infections were initially identified on the basis of cross-reactivity with HIV antigens (8), but to increase sensitivity, SIV lineage-specific ELISAs have been developed.
Western Blot: This is the most common confirmatory test for HIV infection and uses a mechanism to separate out specific HIV antigens.
An indeterminate WB result can also arise from antibodies that are cross-reactive to HIV antigens, such as those associated with HTLV infection; with vaccination against influenza, hepatitis, or rabies; or with animal handlers exposed to unusual viruses.
A project communique said these experts would pursue "innovative approaches for an HIV vaccine enhancing broadly cross-reactive mucosal, humoral and cellular immune responses specific to HIV antigens." It noted: "Despite significant efforts over the past decade to design new vaccines including inactivated-live virus, peptides, proteins or non-replicative vectors, a truly effective HIV vaccine is not yet at hand."
These HIV antigens include p24 (a nucleocapsid protein) and gp 120 and gp41 (envelope proteins).
The most obvious answer is that ongoing release of HIV antigens from the latent pool is sufficient to maintain lymphoid activation.
(17) Many studies have evaluated the validity of test results using either ELISA, rapid tests or WB1s-23 and have reported cross-reactivity between HIV antigens and other disease conditions such as lymphoma, leprosy, biliary cirrhosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, viral hepatitis, multiple sclerosis, influenza, autoimmune diseases, renal failure, blood transfusions, transplantations, injection drug use, alcohol-related liver diseases, multiple pregnancy, malignancies, and malaria.
These prototype vaccines, which contain only a limited number of HIV antigens, are currently being evaluated in Phase I clinical studies.