Hohenlinden


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Hohenlinden

(German hoːənˈlɪndən)
n
(Placename) a village in S Germany, in Bavaria east of Munich: scene of the defeat of the Austrians by the French during the Napoleonic Wars (1800)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Hohenlinden - a town in Bavaria (near Munich)
Bavaria - a state in southern Germany famous for its beer; site of an automobile factory
2.Hohenlinden - a battle during the Napoleonic Wars (1800)Hohenlinden - a battle during the Napoleonic Wars (1800); the French defeated the Austrians
Napoleonic Wars - a series of wars fought between France (led by Napoleon Bonaparte) and alliances involving England and Prussia and Russia and Austria at different times; 1799-1815
Bavaria - a state in southern Germany famous for its beer; site of an automobile factory
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in classic literature ?
I can read pretty well and I know ever so many pieces of poetry off by heart--`The Battle of Hohenlinden' and
'Hohenlinden,' and other spirited battle lyrics; Thomas Moore (1779-1852), a facile but over-sentimental Irishman, author of 'Irish Melodies,' 'Lalla Rookh,' and a famous life of Byron; Charles.
| WHO wrote the war poems Hohenlinden and Ye Mariners Of England?
"When almost beaten at Hohenlinden General Richepanse was on the point of sounding the retreat, unaware that Kniaziewicz was marching to his relief, it was he, Jacek, alias Robak, who braved sword and lance to deliver Kniaziewicz's letters with news that our own lancers were taking the enemy's rear.
The process began when the German territories on the west bank of the Rhine were annexed to France in 1801 under the Treaty of Luneville, which the Hapsburg Emperor, Francis II, had no choice but to accept after the French victories at Marengo and Hohenlinden the previous year.
Macneile Dixon has observed, it is Campbell's martial lyrics such as "Ye Mariners of England," "The Battle of the Baltic," and "Hohenlinden"--and "that inimitable ballad" "Lord Ullin's Daughter"--that assure him his place with the makers of English literature.
Part one, some 23 entries, stretches from the Peloponnesian War (5th century BC) to the battle of Hohenlinden (1800 AD.).
He also produced several stirring patriotic war songs--"Ye Mariners of England," "The Soldier's Dream," "Hohenlinden," and, in 1801, "The Battle of the Baltic." With others he launched a movement in 1825 to found the University of London for students excluded from Oxford or Cambridge by religious tests or lack of funds.