holarchy


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holarchy

(ˈhəʊlˌɑːkɪ)
n
(Commerce) a system composed of interacting holons
[C20: from holo- + -archy]
References in periodicals archive ?
As such, the universe is non-material, self-organizing throughout, a holarchy of complementary, process driven, recursive interactions.
Freud, as is well known, identified two instincts-primary forces, Eros, who has as its goal union, the creation of ever greater unities (see Wilber's idea of holarchy), and Thanatos, who is the destructive instinct; this has as its purpose the dissolution of connections, the destruction of things, bringing life to an inorganic state (matter), that is why Freud called it the death instinct (Wilber 1995: 330).
Part 2 presents tools for designing a business game supported by the platforms Holarchy and SimSoS.
More complex holons emerge by transcending and including their constituent parts, or "sub-holons," creating a "holarchy," or natural hierarchy (Wilber, Brief History 23-43).
And thus, said Koestler, 'hierarchy' should really be called 'holarchy.' He is absolutely right.
Or to put it in terms more familiar to the Perennial Philosophy, liberalism fails to appreciate the Many through which the One expresses itself, including the complex hierarchy (or "holarchy," as it's sometimes put) according to which the Many are ordered.
Throughout his work, Wilber (2000b) conceptualized the basic structures of consciousness with different degrees of specificity, although he usually described the basic structures/stages of human development as 10 holarchical spheres clustered into three broad realms: prepersonal, personal, and suprapersonal (a holarchy is a hierarchy composed of holons; a holon is a whole-part--that which is simultaneously a whole at one level while being a part of the whole at subsequent levels).
The hierarchical structure composed of holons is called a holarchy. Holarchies allow the description of systems as recursive self-similar entities which constitute the holons.
One type of ideal organization is holarchy, a system of organizational structures that link networks together, suggested Elisabet Sahtouris, a biologist specializing in evolution and systems theory.
Portraying this org anizational reality, Sjostrand introduces the notion of organizational 'holarchy', describing a hierarchy of largely autonomous and self-organizing individuals.
Every complex body, whether linguistic, biological, or social, is composed of many holons which form a system called a holarchy. In the Church, the basic holon is the parish which is related to the diocese, regional or national groupings of bishops, and the universal Church.