holograph

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hol·o·graph

 (hŏl′ə-grăf′, hō′lə-)
n.
1. A document written wholly in the handwriting of the person whose signature it bears.
2. See hologram.
adj.
Variant of holographic..

[From Late Latin holographus, entirely written by the signer, from Greek holographos : holo-, holo- + -graphos, -graph.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

holograph

(ˈhɒləˌɡræf; -ˌɡrɑːf)
n
(Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding)
a. a book or document handwritten by its author; original manuscript; autograph
b. (as modifier): a holograph document.
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

hol•o•graph1

(ˈhɒl əˌgræf, -ˌgrɑf, ˈhoʊ lə-)

adj.
1. Also, hol`o•graph′ic (-ˈgræf ɪk) hol`o•graph′i•cal. wholly written by the person in whose name it appears: a holograph letter.
n.
2. a holograph writing, as a deed.
[1650–60; < Late Latin holographus < Late Greek hológraphos. See holo-, -graph]

hol•o•graph2

(ˈhɒl əˌgræf, -ˌgrɑf, ˈhoʊ lə-)
n.
[1965–70; back formation from holography]
ho•log•ra•pher (həˈlɒg rə fər) n.
hol`o•graph′ic (-ˈgræf ɪk) adj.
hol`o•graph′i•cal•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

holograph

a manuscript or other document written completely in the hand of the person above whose name it appears. — holograph, holographic, adj.
See also: Manuscripts
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.holograph - handwritten book or documentholograph - handwritten book or document  
autograph - something written by one's own hand
leaf-book, codex - an unbound manuscript of some ancient classic (as distinguished from a scroll)
palimpsest - a manuscript (usually written on papyrus or parchment) on which more than one text has been written with the earlier writing incompletely erased and still visible
scroll, roll - a document that can be rolled up (as for storage)
2.holograph - the intermediate photograph (or photographic record) that contains information for reproducing a three-dimensional image by holography
photo, photograph, pic, exposure, picture - a representation of a person or scene in the form of a print or transparent slide; recorded by a camera on light-sensitive material
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

holograph

[ˈhɒləgrɑːf]
A. ADJológrafo
B. Nológrafo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
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References in periodicals archive ?
The earliest known holograph letter from Margaret following her first in 1503 is a letter to Henry VIII in July 1514 (opening lines): (10)
One recipient of a holograph letter wryly observed that, although some of the handwriting was unreadable, 'the grouping of the words had a certain charm like that of old lace or the delicate tracery of vine leaves'.
Arnold's on a newly-discovered holograph letter (University of Kansas, Kenneth Spencer Research Library, MS Crawford 177) and Susan Lauffer O'Hara's on the 'stage rubrics' in Wroth's Folger manuscript of Pamphilia to Amphilanthus, advance knowledge of this writer.
Maps, paintings, drawings, portraits and a holograph letter of Collingwood's cover the walls: much of the furniture was made by Menorcan craftsmen almost--but not quite succeeding in--copying English taste of the time.
The former is referred to as a holograph letter, whereas the latter is known as an autograph letter.
The above possibility is not far-fetched because Swift habitually retained copies of letters he sent to his many correspondents, and, as a reader of an earlier version of this article points out, "these often show textual variations -- either because he retained an early draft, recopied and improved for the posted version, or because he inadvertently improved on the posted version while making his copy afterwards." Thus it may be more likely that the holograph letter or some manuscript state of it may yet appear through researches into Swift, so to speak, rather than those into Mary Delany -- this, not to suggest of course that the two figures are so neatly separable.
55) was entered in the manuscript (henceforth D) by Mary Shelton.(2) However, the hand responsible for the poem is that of a signed holograph letter from Mary Fitzroy to her father, the Duke of Norfolk, amongst the Cotton MSS in the British Library.
The above possibility is not far-fetched because Swift habitually retained copies of letters he sent to his many correspondents, and, as a reader of an earlier version of this article points out, "these often show textual variations--either because he retained an early draft, recopied and improved for the posted version, or because he inadvertently improved on the posted version while making his copy afterwards." Thus it may be more likely that the holograph letter or some manuscript state of it may yet appear through researches into Swift, so to speak, rather than those into Mary Delany--this, not to suggest of course that the two figures are so neatly separable.
A collation of the holograph letter Carlyle wrote to Ralph Waldo Emerson on 2 March 1847 (Houghton Library, bMS 1280) with the text as printed in the Collected Letters reveals seven errors: A colon substituted for a final period, a comma omitted, Carlyle's underlining emphasizing the first syllable of "undiaphanous" dropped, the word "it" omitted, "so" substituted for "no," "utterance" substituted for "utterances," and "lore" substituted for "love" (21:170-172).
This could safely be done only if one had at hand a holograph letter also signed by the writer, and as I have not seen such documents for these women, I cannot place them in D, except for the hand of Mary Shelton.' But Margaret Douglas's and Mary Fitzroy's hands are the easiest in this manuscript to identify, because the Calendars of State Papers list several signed holograph letters by them, of which one by each is to be found in the British Library, where it can be directly compared with D.
The first holograph letter is either the only page or the second page of a letter announcing to Wasson that the Four Seas Company would be publishing The Marble Faun, and it was probably written sometime in the late summer of 1924.