kiss of peace

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kiss of peace

n.
A ceremonial gesture, such as a kiss or handclasp, used as a sign of love and union in some Christian churches during celebration of the Eucharist.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

kiss′ of peace′


n.
a ceremonial greeting or embrace given as a token of Christian love and unity.
[1895–1900]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.kiss of peace - (Roman Catholic Church) a greeting signifying Christian love for those assisting at the Eucharist
greeting, salutation - (usually plural) an acknowledgment or expression of good will (especially on meeting)
Church of Rome, Roman Catholic Church, Roman Church, Western Church, Roman Catholic - the Christian Church based in the Vatican and presided over by a pope and an episcopal hierarchy
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Among early Christians, the "holy kiss" was a sign of fellowship.
claiming that Christians invented the Holy kiss. Instead, the idea here
Another early Christian writer, Ter-tullian (died 230), asks, "What prayer is complete without the holy kiss?" He saw the kiss as a seal of the prayer that preceded it.
Other practices that highlighted the distinctly Christian nature of the gathering included the invitation to communal confession; the holy kiss as a greeting that signified reconciliation in a new, non-biological "family"; the reading of letters and Hebrew Scriptures; the offering of prayers; the singing of hymns; and instruction of the faithful instead of after-dinner entertainment.
Who today takes literally the writings of the Bible that say: "God makes the clouds his chariot" or "let the hills sing out for joy" or "let the floods clap their hands?" When the author of the New Testament letter to Timothy tells him to "Greet all the brothers with a holy kiss," there are few who claim to take the five passages in the Bible that call for such a greeting literally and therefore meet people at their church door with lips puckered.