Homeric simile


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Related to Homeric simile: epic simile

Homeric simile

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Irony was understood during the Renaissance as a way to reconcile opposing beliefs or perspectives, and Chapman, perhaps more so than others at the time, grasped "the Homeric simile, with its latent irony, as a means of uniting contrary styles and attitudes--high and low, sublime and bathetic, serious and trivial--at play in the Iliad and Odyssey" (260).
A similar twofold effect is achieved in another Homeric simile, which was already praised in antiquity.
Concluding that what Homer is showing is a war scene; it depicts the anguish of a mother and a daughter running away from their male captors in (2008), "Reinterpreting the Homeric Simile of Iliad 16.
16) There Montaigne, after attacking the fatuity of pedantry by reusing a Homeric simile (as birds carry food in their beaks to their chicks without eating it, so pedants do not properly ingest the contents of the lessons they deliver to their infant charges), (17) adds:
20) To better explain this process and to show how Fuller selects her citations to provoke a crisis in the sensational information of Duff Gordon's translation, I first want to return to the idea of the Homeric simile.
In Part III Sfyroeras ("Like Purple on Ivory: A Homeric Simile in Statius' Achilleid" pp.
Putting these modern accounts together with the Homeric simile caused Due to reexamine Achilles' words: what Achilles seems to be trying to say, in his own soldierly way, is that he has experienced the same intensity of war that Sgt.
Germane at this point is Albert Cook's observation that "being often firm in the visual base of items brought into comparison, and always so in the implied clarity of visible elements it names, the Homeric simile can proceed assuredly and expansively towards enriching its complications" (1985, 210).
Immediately, at this point, both the scholar-gipsy and the Victorian sage disappear and a completely new voice, uttering a Homeric simile, becomes dominant.
The warriors' dream of peace," Knox says, "is projected over and over again" in the Homeric simile.
Sunrises, sunsets, and a great wall are conspicuous, and one astonishing Homeric simile passes by, beginning "Just as a good pianist will adjust the piano stool.
Even more problematic in The Husbands is the Homeric simile, the dynamic of which Logue seemed to have truly grasped in his many remarkable juxtapositions of mundane, modern bits of life with the horrors of war.