Homeric simile


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Related to Homeric simile: epic simile

Homeric simile

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A similar twofold effect is achieved in another Homeric simile, which was already praised in antiquity.
Concluding that what Homer is showing is a war scene; it depicts the anguish of a mother and a daughter running away from their male captors in (2008), "Reinterpreting the Homeric Simile of Iliad 16.7-11: The Girl and the Mother in Ancient Greek Warfare," American Journal of Philology 129(2): 146; hereafter abbreviated "RH."
(16) There Montaigne, after attacking the fatuity of pedantry by reusing a Homeric simile (as birds carry food in their beaks to their chicks without eating it, so pedants do not properly ingest the contents of the lessons they deliver to their infant charges), (17) adds:
(20) To better explain this process and to show how Fuller selects her citations to provoke a crisis in the sensational information of Duff Gordon's translation, I first want to return to the idea of the Homeric simile.
Putting these modern accounts together with the Homeric simile caused Due to reexamine Achilles' words: what Achilles seems to be trying to say, in his own soldierly way, is that he has experienced the same intensity of war that Sgt.
Germane at this point is Albert Cook's observation that "being often firm in the visual base of items brought into comparison, and always so in the implied clarity of visible elements it names, the Homeric simile can proceed assuredly and expansively towards enriching its complications" (1985, 210).
The second form of re-orientation introduced into the poem by the Homeric simile is generated by its display of action.
"The warriors' dream of peace," Knox says, "is projected over and over again" in the Homeric simile. (4) An arrow meant for Menelaus, Helen's rightful husband, is deflected by Athena "as quick as a mother flicks a fly from her baby sleeping softly" (Book 4, lines 148-51); the voices of the old men of Troy, who watch the battles from atop the city gates, are "clear as cicadas/settled on treetops, lifting their voices through the forest,/rising softly, falling, dying away ..." (Book 3, lines 180-83).
But wait till my ambition / comes a cropper, whatever that means, or bursts into feathered bloom / and burns on the shore." Sunrises, sunsets, and a great wall are conspicuous, and one astonishing Homeric simile passes by, beginning "Just as a good pianist will adjust the piano stool." And like Achilles and Sarpedon, various figures pause to philosophize about mortality: "In time, he said, we all go under the fluted covers / of this great world, with its spiral dissonances." But Ashbery is without Homer's-and Darger's-interest in violent death.
Even more problematic in The Husbands is the Homeric simile, the dynamic of which Logue seemed to have truly grasped in his many remarkable juxtapositions of mundane, modern bits of life with the horrors of war.
Scott, `The Oral Nature of the Homeric Simile', Mnemosyne Suppl.