Homestead Act


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Related to Homestead Act: Dawes Act

Homestead Act

n.
An act passed by Congress in 1862 enabling persons who settled on undeveloped 160-acre tracts of land to gain title after meeting certain criteria, such as residing on and cultivating the land for five years after the initial claim.

Homestead Act

n
1. (Law) an act passed by the US Congress in 1862 making available to settlers 160-acre tracts of public land for cultivation
2. (Law) (in Canada) a similar act passed by the Canadian Parliament in 1872

Home′stead Act`


n.
a special act of Congress (1862) that made public lands in the West available to settlers without payment, usu. in lots of 160 acres, to be used as farms.
References in periodicals archive ?
That half a million dollars will be set aside as escrow for the 5-year-old girl until a judge decides whether or not the Homestead Act applies to the situation.
In 1852, The Homestead Act, which tarned over 270 million acres of public land to private citizens, gave rise to another type of mutual.
1862 Homestead Act and permitted single women to make homestead claims.
Later still, the 1887 Code re-enacted the 1877 Homestead Act, with
Midwest Heartland: Theodore Roosevelt to The Homestead Act
This program included a Homestead Act, a Land Grant Education Act, an income tax, a protective tariff, and, by the Civil War's end, a constitutional amendment to abolish slavery.
John had brought the family from Canada to Benzie County in 1863 to take advantage of the Homestead Act.
The Homestead Act, which dates back to 1862 (and is no longer in effect), impacted our world.
To be sure, the Homestead Act didn't breed a culture of dependency, but it is hardly a paradigm case of state action.
Following a 40-year frenzy of free giveaways under the Homestead Act, colored by colossal fraud, Presidents Benjamin Harrison and Teddy Roosevelt set aside some of the remaining federal land as national forests.
The task force recommended the passage of a Capital Homesteading Act, in conscious imitation of the Homestead Act signed by Abraham Lincoln in the midst of the Civil War, which opened up the immense store of wealth represented by the great plains of North America to all citizens who were willing and able to work the land.
Congress used elements from the Homestead Act of 1862 to grant land to settlers and to protect those grants from pre-existing creditors during the early settlement period.