Homestead Act

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Homestead Act

n.
An act passed by Congress in 1862 enabling persons who settled on undeveloped 160-acre tracts of land to gain title after meeting certain criteria, such as residing on and cultivating the land for five years after the initial claim.

Homestead Act

n
1. (Law) an act passed by the US Congress in 1862 making available to settlers 160-acre tracts of public land for cultivation
2. (Law) (in Canada) a similar act passed by the Canadian Parliament in 1872

Home′stead Act`


n.
a special act of Congress (1862) that made public lands in the West available to settlers without payment, usu. in lots of 160 acres, to be used as farms.
References in periodicals archive ?
10) (the purpose of the homestead laws is to promote stability and welfare of the state by encouraging property ownership and independence of the citizens).
(Exception: In many states, homestead laws protect a spouse.)
(8) The state constitutional framework for homestead laws,
Lands, Extending Homestead Laws to the District of Alaska, Etc., H.R.
In 1909 and again in 1912, the homestead laws were loosened, so settlers could acquire 320 acres of free land by living on their acreage for three years and cultivating crops.
To most fourth graders, learning about the history of land ordinances, homestead laws, and political arguments over the direction of government policy is as dry as the Great American Desert.
million acres were transferred to individuals under the homestead laws
Knack writing on Utah Indians and homestead laws; John H.
A proving-up period, similar to old homestead laws, makes much more economic and ecological sense for long term interests.
Federal law and Florida partition, intestacy, and homestead laws do not afford enough protection for tenants in common holding heirs' property, resulting in the loss of homes and wealth in these communities.
South Dakota's homestead laws have long been a lively topic of