homograph

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hom·o·graph

 (hŏm′ə-grăf′, hō′mə-)
n.
One of two or more words that have the same spelling but differ in origin, meaning, and sometimes pronunciation, such as fair (pleasing in appearance) and fair (market) or wind (wĭnd) and wind (wīnd).

hom′o·graph′ic adj.

homograph

(ˈhɒməˌɡræf; -ˌɡrɑːf)
n
(Linguistics) one of a group of words spelt in the same way but having different meanings. Compare heteronym
ˌhomoˈgraphic adj

hom•o•graph

(ˈhɒm əˌgræf, -ˌgrɑf, ˈhoʊ mə-)

n.
a word of the same written form as another but of different meaning and usu. origin, whether pronounced the same way or not, as bear1 “to carry; support” and bear2 “animal” or lead1 “to conduct” and lead2 “metal.”
[1800–10]
hom`o•graph′ic (-ˈgræf ɪk) adj.
syn: See homonym.

homograph

A word with the same spelling as another word but a different meaning.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.homograph - two words are homographs if they are spelled the same way but differ in meaning (e.g. fair)
homonym - two words are homonyms if they are pronounced or spelled the same way but have different meanings
Translations
homograf
Homograph
‏הומוגרף
homografistopisnica
同音異義語同音語
homograf
eş sesli
多音字

homograph

[ˈhɒməʊgrɑːf] Nhomógrafo m

homograph

nHomograf nt
References in periodicals archive ?
The test corpus included numbers, homographs (two or more words spelled the same but not necessarily pronounced the same and having different meanings and origins), words of foreign origin, acronyms, abbreviations, proper names, and addresses.
A useful resource for investigating the relation of similarly spelled words in Shakespeare's early works is the list of homographs provided by Marvin Spevack in his foundational Shakespeare Concordance.
Another example is the tracing of the distinction between the homographs [.
128) For the sake of simplicity, I include within homonymy both homophones, words that sound the same but have different written forms and different meanings, and homographs, words with the same written form but different pronunciations and meanings; see generally Ekaterina Klepousniotou, The Processing of Lexical Ambiguity: Homonymy and Polysemy in the Mental Lexicon, 81 BRAIN & LANGUAGE 205 (2001).
Homographs (same spelling but different meaning and pronunciation) are a perfect example.
Unvowelled Arabic texts are orthographically opaque, and include many heterophonic as well as homophonic homographs.
You're right that novel is synonymous with new, but this adjective is the newer of the two homographs, having first appeared in English in the 15th century.
There are two main levels of Arabic ambiguity [10,30]: (1) Homographs are words that have the same spelling, but different meanings.
In my lectures I highlight the importance of paying attention to both context and co-text, particularly for the disambiguation of homonyms/ homographs and lexemes that change their meaning according to their concordance.
Caption: Figure 2: Ambiguity caused by homographs and polysemes
He noted with surprise that he was unable to find any homographic Russian verb forms, nor any homographs of more than five letters.
All of the dictionaries contain individual words only, and homographs are explicitly treated by the program through statistical weighting procedures, which are intended to partially correct for the context (Hart 2000).