Honeyberry


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Hon´ey`ber`ry


n.1.The fruit of either of two trees having sweetish berries: (a) An Old World hackberry (Celtis australis). (b) In the West Indies, the genip (Melicocca bijuga).
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, published 1913 by G. & C. Merriam Co.
References in periodicals archive ?
The co-op will use the funding for work with the James Hutton Institute to research honeyberry crop types and their nutritional and commercial potential.
In the only way she knew how to express her love, the queen resolutely--and some say impulsively--trampled off in search of the fabled honeyberry, the supposed antidote to all the one thousand ailments that could ever befall an elephant.
As the Scouts and volunteers planted yarrow, asparagus, chives, wild blue indigo, raspberry, daffodils, sorrel, coneflower, honeyberry, purple passion, New Jersey tea, strawberries and bee balm, Trendler and volunteer Dennis Corbin of Naperville taught them about the benefits of edible gardening.
Also, the excretion of IgA in rats fed with extracts of haskap (honeyberry) and aronia fruits was increased, likewise demonstrating immune-stimulating effects [154].
From September 28-October 2, 2013, The Honeyberry Farm (www.
Check through seed catalogues for new types and cultivars of fruit to try this year, including new selections of kiwi fruits, hardy citrus bushes, new Blackberries, Amelanchier Felsenbirne, Aronia, Goji and Honeyberry.
Save pounds 5 on honeyberries The honeyberry, Lonicera caerulea Kamtschtica, is new to British gardens.
Honeyberry (a honeysuckle) is taking nurseries by storm with its sweet/tart, blueberry-like fruit that ripens weeks before your strawberries and thrives in cold.
For this reason, pump up your yard with trusted and/or native fruits before trying goumi (Elaeagnus mulliflora), honeyberry (Lonicera caerulea), and other recent imports with eerily close genetic ties to known invasive species.
Honeyberry Farms, Hungry Horse, Montana, (406)387-5078.
As the Scouts and volunteers planted yarrow, asparagus, chives, wild blue indigo, raspberry, daffodils, sorrel, coneflower, brazelberry, honeyberry, purple passion, New Jersey tea, strawberries and bee balm, Trendler and volunteer Dennis Corbin of Naperville taught them about the benefits of edible gardening.