honey locust

(redirected from Honeylocust tree)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to Honeylocust tree: linden tree

honey locust

n.
Any of several trees of the genus Gleditsia of the pea family, especially G. triacanthos of eastern North America, which has pinnately compound leaves, large twisted pods with a sweet pulp, and usually thorns on the trunk and branches.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

honey locust

n
1. (Plants) a thorny leguminous tree, Gleditsia triacanthos of E North America, that has long pods containing a sweet-tasting pulp
2. (Plants) another name for mesquite
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

hon′ey lo`cust


n.
a thorny North American tree, Gleditsia triacanthos, of the legume family, having pinnate leaves and pods with a sweet pulp.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.honey locust - tall usually spiny North American tree having small greenish-white flowers in drooping racemes followed by long twisting seed podshoney locust - tall usually spiny North American tree having small greenish-white flowers in drooping racemes followed by long twisting seed pods; yields very hard durable reddish-brown wood; introduced to temperate Old World
locust tree, locust - any of various hardwood trees of the family Leguminosae
genus Gleditsia, Gleditsia - deciduous trees: honey locusts
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
A crowd stood before him; around him stretched a fresh graveyard filled with fathers, sons, and brothers; and just yards away, observing the proceedings in silence, was a giant honeylocust tree.
The pinnate compound leaves of the honeylocust tree, tiny yellow almost feather-like pieces, two kinds of elliptical leaves, two kinds of lance-shaped leaves, and finally, in perfect golden glory slightly tinted with orangeish red, a palmate leaf from our very own front yard sugar maple.
The honeylocust tree grows in single or scattered groups.