honorer

(redirected from Honore)
Also found in: Wikipedia.
Related to Honore: dictionary

hon·or

 (ŏn′ər)
n.
1. High respect, as that shown for special merit; recognition or esteem: the honor shown to a Nobel laureate; the place of honor at the table.
2.
a. Great privilege: I have the honor of presenting the governor.
b. Good name; reputation: I must defend my honor.
c. A source or cause of credit: was an honor to the profession.
3. A mark, token, or gesture of respect or distinction, such as a military decoration.
4. honors
a. Public acts or ceremonies showing respect: was buried with full honors.
b. Special recognition for unusual academic achievement: graduated with honors.
c. A program of advanced study for exceptional students: planned to take honors in history.
d. Social courtesies offered to guests: did the honors at tea.
5. High rank: assumed the honor of kingship.
6. Honor Used with His, Her, or Your as a title and form of address for certain officials, such as judges and the mayors of certain cities: Her Honor, Judge Jones.
7.
a. A sense of principled uprightness of character; personal integrity: conducted herself with honor; saw the challenge as a matter of honor.
b. A code of integrity, dignity, and pride, chiefly among men, that was maintained in some societies, as in feudal Europe, by force of arms.
c. A woman's chastity or reputation for chastity.
8. Sports The right of being first at the tee in golf.
9. Games
a. Any of the four or five highest cards, especially the ace, king, queen, jack, and ten of the trump suit, in card games such as bridge or whist.
b. often honors The points allotted to these cards.
tr.v. hon·ored, hon·or·ing, hon·ors
1.
a. To hold in respect; esteem: a researcher who is highly honored for her work.
b. To show respect for: honored the volunteers with a party.
c. To confer distinction on: He has honored us with his presence.
d. To bow to (another dancer) in square dancing: Honor your partner.
2. To accept or pay as valid: honor a check; a store that honors all credit cards.
Idioms:
honor bound
Under an obligation enforced by the personal integrity of the one obliged: I was honor bound to admit that she had done the work.
on (one's) honor
Under an obligation enforced by the personal integrity of the one obliged.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin.]

hon′or·er n.
Synonyms: honor, homage, reverence, veneration, deference
These nouns denote admiration, respect, or esteem accorded to another as a right or as due. Honor is the most general term: A stamp was issued in honor of her achievements. The ritual was intended to show honor to one's ancestors. Homage is often in the form of a ceremonial tribute that conveys allegiance: "There is no country in which so absolute a homage is paid to wealth" (Ralph Waldo Emerson).
Reverence is a feeling of deep respect and devotion: "Kill reverence and you've killed the hero in man" (Ayn Rand).
Veneration is both the feeling and the reverential expression of respect, love, and awe: "The account of Turner's Rebellion that followed left no doubt that the authors considered the rebel leader a hero and martyr, worthy of veneration" (Scot French).
Deference is courteous, respectful regard for another that often implies yielding to him or her: The children were taught to show deference to their elders.
References in classic literature ?
He reached the Rue Saint Honore and went up it toward the Rue de la Ferronnerie; there the aspect changed; here it was the tradesmen who were running from shop to shop; their doors seemed closed like their shutters, but they were only pushed to in such a manner as to open and allow the men, who seemed fearful of showing what they carried, to enter, closing immediately.
From the Rue de Bons Enfants to that of the Ferronnerie, from the Rue Saint Thomas-du-Louvre to the Pont Neuf, from the Rue Richelieu to the Porte Saint Honore, there were more than ten thousand armed men; those who were at the front hurled defiance at the impassive sentinels of the regiment of guards posted around the Palais Royal, the gates of which were closed behind them, a precaution which made their situation precarious.
He attempted to ride over those gray cloaks, but the gray cloaks held their ground and the marshal retired toward the Rue Saint Honore, leaving four of his guards dead on the field of battle.
The marshal then entered the Rue Saint Honore, but there he was opposed by the barricades of the mendicant of Saint Eustache.
In Praise of Slowness: How a Worldwide Movement Is Challenging the Cult of Speed by Carl Honore HarperSanFrancisco.
Honore tells of a "backlash against speed that is moving into the mainstream.
The Slow Food movement, based in Italy, promotes "the very civilized notion that what we eat should be cultivated, cooked, and consumed at a relaxed pace," writes Honore.