Hooke's law


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Hooke's law

(hʊks)
n
(General Physics) the principle that the stress imposed on a solid is directly proportional to the strain produced, within the elastic limit
[C18: named after Robert Hooke ]

Hooke's law

A law in physics stating that the extent to which an elastic material will change size and shape under stress is directly proportional to the amount of stress applied to it. If a spring is stretched to a length of 6 inches (15.2 centimeters) by a force of 1 newton, for example, it will be stretched to a length of 12 inches (30.4 centimeters) by a force of 2 newtons.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Hooke's law - (physics) the principle that (within the elastic limit) the stress applied to a solid is proportional to the strain produced
law of nature, law - a generalization that describes recurring facts or events in nature; "the laws of thermodynamics"
natural philosophy, physics - the science of matter and energy and their interactions; "his favorite subject was physics"
References in periodicals archive ?
Hooke's Law is a principle of spring design relating to Load and Deflection.
For a viscoelastic material, which obeys the Kelvin-Voigt laws, Hooke's law is written as follows:
Using (1) and Hooke's law for the flat tense state of the orthotropic belt, we obtain:
The word "stress" was first mentioned in explaining elasticity in Hooke's Law of 1658, "the magnitude of an external force or stress, produces a proportional amount of deformation, or strain in malleable metal." Accordingly, and after years, in 1936, Hans Selye, defined stress as "the non-specific response of body to any demand for change." After many laboratory experiments that he did on animals, he noticed that animals who were subjected to different physical or emotional stimuli lead to developing diseases similar to the ones people face every day such as heart attacks and strokes.
Hooke's law (Moyer, 1977) states that the force required to compress a spring is linearly proportional to the distance from its equilibrium length as follows:
It is well known that the speeds of waves for the linear elastic materials (n = 1, Hooke's law) depend only on the material properties in contrast to that of the waves in nonlinear materials.
Although Hooke's Law gives exact analytical solution to Schrodinger's Equation in the simple model of quantum harmonic oscillator, Morse's Law is more general as it takes both the anharmonicity and the overtone transitions into account.
To evaluate m and [tau] for the thin membrane, we use Hooke's law which is a relatively simpler constitutive law for modeling small deformation of capsules.
Mathematical formulas such as Hooke's law [14] and, Newton's second and third laws [15] are utilized to evaluate the route reply and choose the best path.
In the case of our simple rod, there is a very handy relationship between the applied axial stress and the resulting strain, called Hooke's law. This is named after Robert Hooke (1635-1703), the English scientist who formulated not only the law named after him, but remarkably, also proposed an undulating theory of light, introduced the term "cell" to biology, postulated elliptical orbits for the earth and moon, and proposed the inverse square law of gravitational attraction.
For a linearly elastic spring with rest length L hanging vertically from a fixed support, Hooke's law is about the spring elongation E caused by a load with weight W hung on the lower end of the spring.