Hooke's law

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Related to Hookes law: Young's modulus

Hooke's law

(hʊks)
n
(General Physics) the principle that the stress imposed on a solid is directly proportional to the strain produced, within the elastic limit
[C18: named after Robert Hooke ]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Hooke's law

A law in physics stating that the extent to which an elastic material will change size and shape under stress is directly proportional to the amount of stress applied to it. If a spring is stretched to a length of 6 inches (15.2 centimeters) by a force of 1 newton, for example, it will be stretched to a length of 12 inches (30.4 centimeters) by a force of 2 newtons.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Hooke's law - (physics) the principle that (within the elastic limit) the stress applied to a solid is proportional to the strain produced
law of nature, law - a generalization that describes recurring facts or events in nature; "the laws of thermodynamics"
natural philosophy, physics - the science of matter and energy and their interactions; "his favorite subject was physics"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.