Horace


Also found in: Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Horace: Horus

Hor·ace

 (hôr′əs, hŏr′-) Originally Quintus Horatius Flaccus. 65-8 bc.
Roman lyric poet. His Odes and Satires have exerted a major influence on English poetry.

Ho·ra′tian (hə-rā′shən) adj.

Horace

(ˈhɒrɪs)
n
(Biography) Latin name Quintus Horatius Flaccus. 65–8 bc, Roman poet and satirist: his verse includes the lyrics in the Epodes and the Odes, the Epistles and Satires, and the Ars Poetica

Hor•ace

(ˈhɔr ɪs, ˈhɒr-)

n.
(Quintus Horatius Flaccus) 65–8 B.C., Roman poet and satirist.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Horace - Roman lyric poet said to have influenced English poetry (65-8 BC)
Translations

Horace

[ˈhɒrɪs] NHoracio

Horace

nHoraz m

Horace

[ˈhɒrɪs] nOrazio
References in classic literature ?
I am an officer in the English army--my name is Horace Holmcroft.
Horace Holmcroft entered the room again at the moment when Surgeon Wetzel's staring eyes were still fastened on her, waiting for her reply.
Horace seated himself, and dipped the pen in the ink.
Horace returned to the business of filling up the form.
Left alone with Surgeon Wetzel, Horace noticed the strange old man still bending intently over the English lady who had been killed by the shell.
As Garrick, whom I regard in tragedy to be the greatest genius the world hath ever produced, sometimes condescends to play the fool; so did Scipio the Great, and Laelius the Wise, according to Horace, many years ago; nay, Cicero reports them to have been "incredibly childish." These, it is true, played the fool, like my friend Garrick, in jest only; but several eminent characters have, in numberless instances of their lives, played the fool egregiously in earnest; so far as to render it a matter of some doubt whether their wisdom or folly was predominant; or whether they were better intitled to the applause or censure, the admiration or contempt, the love or hatred, of mankind.
Those persons, indeed, who have passed any time behind the scenes of this great theatre, and are thoroughly acquainted not only with the several disguises which are there put on, but also with the fantastic and capricious behaviour of the Passions, who are the managers and directors of this theatre (for as to Reason, the patentee, he is known to be a very idle fellow and seldom to exert himself), may most probably have learned to understand the famous nil admirari of Horace, or in the English phrase, to stare at nothing.
There, seated before a walnut table he had brought with him from Hartwell, and to which, from one of those fancies not uncommon to great people, he was particularly attached, the king, Louis XVIII., was carelessly listening to a man of fifty or fifty-two years of age, with gray hair, aristocratic bearing, and exceedingly gentlemanly attire, and meanwhile making a marginal note in a volume of Gryphius's rather inaccurate, but much sought-after, edition of Horace -- a work which was much indebted to the sagacious observations of the philosophical monarch.
"Caninus surdis," replied the king, continuing the annotations in his Horace.
wrote, in a hand as small as possible, another note on the margin of his Horace, and then looking at the duke with the air of a man who thinks he has an idea of his own, while he is only commenting upon the idea of another, said, --
remained alone, and turning his eyes on his half-opened Horace, muttered, --
There's the Reverend Horace promoted to that living at four hundred and fifty pounds a year; there are our two boys receiving the very best education, and distinguishing themselves as steady scholars and good fellows; there are three of the girls married very comfortably; there are three more living with us; there are three more keeping house for the Reverend Horace since Mrs.