Horatian


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Related to Horatian: Horatian ode

Hor·ace

 (hôr′əs, hŏr′-) Originally Quintus Horatius Flaccus. 65-8 bc.
Roman lyric poet. His Odes and Satires have exerted a major influence on English poetry.

Ho·ra′tian (hə-rā′shən) adj.

Horatian

(həˈreɪʃən)
adj
(Poetry) of, relating to, or characteristic of Horace or his poetry

Ho•ra•tian

(həˈreɪ ʃən, hɔ-, hoʊ-)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to Horace.
2.
a. of, pertaining to, or resembling the poetic style or diction of Horace.
b. of or noting a Horatian ode.
[1740–50; < Latin Horātiānus=Horāti(us) Horace + -ānus -an1]
Translations

Horatian

[hɒˈreɪʃən] ADJhoraciano

Horatian

adjhorazisch
References in classic literature ?
*An Horatian ode upon Cromwell's return from Ireland.
Still another, minor, innovation of Wyatt was the introduction into English verse of the Horatian 'satire' (moral poem, reflecting on current follies) in the form of three metrical letters to friends.
Among their topics are figured books: Horatian book-representations, poetic quotation in fourth-century BC Attic oratory, Latin epigraphy and literary texts in fourth-century AD Rome: the case of Vettius Agorius Praetextatus, the library and scriptorium of the Abbey of Montevergine during the 12th and 13th centuries: presences and absences, and the textual transmission of Ovid's Metamorphoses during the Medieval Age: the example of Germany.
Patricia Lucas Alonso shows how "la ecfrasis cervantina" works in the description of the tomb of Durandarte seen in the cave of Montesinos and during Master Peter's puppet show and foregrounds Cervantes's contribution to the rhetorical debate augured by the Horatian ut pictura poesis.
A manuscript volume in the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, New Haven, CT, contains an unnoticed and apparently unique copy of a Horatian imitation ascribed by the copyist to Allan Ramsay.
Before this comes the fascinating treatment of 'Horatian "ghosts"', suitably starting the book with a look at the beginnings of the whole bibliographical enterprise.
Offering an intricate assessment of Horatian Ode 4.7, Seiden shows how "the marble-like perfection of its language" contrasts markedly with its "overriding preoccupation with death" (p.
Fanshawe also used a rhymed version of this stanza in some of his Horatian translations in 1652, though not for his version of the ode to Pyrrha.
In fact, Horatian iambic continually notes the unmartial status and weakness of the speaker's body.
Sure, Colbert took Bush down a peg, and Stewart took down CNBC "Mad Money" host Jim Cramer, and publicly shamed Senate Republicans into supporting medical care for 9/11 first responders, but more often than not they employed Horatian rather than Juvenalian satire.
After joining the faculty at Dartmouth College in 1952, Elias began to publish a series of seminal articles on the poetry of the Renaissance, among which "The Horatian Epistle and Its Introduction into Spanish Literature" and "The Pastoral Paradox of Natural Art" stand out as models of scholarship and would become obligatory reading for all scholars of the period.