Horatian ode


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Related to Horatian ode: Pindaric ode

Horatian ode

n.
An ode in which a fixed stanzaic pattern is followed.

Horatian ode

n
(Poetry) an ode of several stanzas, each of the same metrical pattern. Also called: Sapphic ode
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Noun1.Horatian ode - an ode with several stanzas
ode - a lyric poem with complex stanza forms
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Cousins does not address all the poems in Miscellaneous Poems, choosing instead to focus his six chapters on key clusters of poems that scholarship has emphasized as major works: the Mower poems; 'Nymph Complaining' and 'To his Coy Mistress'; 'Bermudas' and 'The Garden'; the religious verse ('The Coronet', the Dialogue poems, 'Eyes and Tears', 'On a Drop of Dew'); the Royalist poems and 'An Horatian Ode'; and 'Upon Appleton House'.
In almost every other translation of an Horatian Ode that I have seen there is too much ease and too little difficulty." (50)
He broke into songs or poems in several languages, once finishing a Horatian ode in Latin begun by a German General he and his comrades had kidnapped in Crete.
One moonlit night, high up, Fermor was guarding the general when Kreipe, gazing up at the snowy peak, recited the first line of an Horatian ode (Ad Thaliarchum): "Vides ut alta stet nive candidum" ("See how Soracte stands white with snow on high").
Among his topics are English Renaissance poets and the translating tradition, Dryden's Horatian ode, classical translation and the formation of the English literary canon, Wordsworth's suppressed eighth satire, and Ted Hughes' Homer.
Richard Lovelace, upon his Poems," "Upon the Death of Lord Hastings," and "Tom May's Death" within close temporal proximity of the pro-Republican "An Horatian Ode upon Cromwell's Return from Ireland." Was Marvell merely an opportunistic flip-flopper early in his poetic career?
In 'An Horatian Ode Upon Cromwell's Return to Ireland', Marvell contrasted Charles's manner with what he portrayed as the vindictive humbug of the Puritan soldiers when they 'did clap their bloody hands' at the king's death.
The primary interests of Anderson's book are the ways in which the past, as trauma, refuses to stay in the past but impinges upon the present and the ways in which early modern texts from Titus Andronicus to Marvell's "An Horatian Ode" both register and attempt to cope with these traumatic intrusions of the past.
Another (unrecognized) imitation of a Horatian ode by Tennyson can be found in the dedicatory poem (1883) attached to Tiresias, addressed to the poet and gentleman Edward Fitzgerald, his friend since their shared Cambridge days and author of the famous version of the Persian Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam, who might naturally be expected to pick up on this Latin link (on Fitzgerald and Horace, see further below).
Marvell's Horatian Ode (1650) and his First Anniversary (1655) indeed celebrate Cromwellian rule on precisely these grounds.
Thus, in his "Horatian Ode," he allows the execution scene pointedly to interrupt Cromwell's triumphant march, sustaining the sense of loss, but at the same time he presents the scene as a monumental event subject to interpretation, and thus to attenuation.
One is tempted to apply Marvell's words in praise of Cromwell: 'So much one man can do, That does both act and know' ('Horatian Ode', ll.