Horace

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Hor·ace

 (hôr′əs, hŏr′-) Originally Quintus Horatius Flaccus. 65-8 bc.
Roman lyric poet. His Odes and Satires have exerted a major influence on English poetry.

Ho·ra′tian (hə-rā′shən) adj.

Horace

(ˈhɒrɪs)
n
(Biography) Latin name Quintus Horatius Flaccus. 65–8 bc, Roman poet and satirist: his verse includes the lyrics in the Epodes and the Odes, the Epistles and Satires, and the Ars Poetica

Hor•ace

(ˈhɔr ɪs, ˈhɒr-)

n.
(Quintus Horatius Flaccus) 65–8 B.C., Roman poet and satirist.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Horace - Roman lyric poet said to have influenced English poetry (65-8 BC)
Translations

Horace

[ˈhɒrɪs] NHoracio

Horace

nHoraz m

Horace

[ˈhɒrɪs] nOrazio
References in classic literature ?
Jessie returned certain odes of one Horatius Flaccus to the corner, and uttered an exclamation.
Per questo la variabilitAaAaAeA della lingua descritta passo spesso citato da Orazio (Quintus Horatius Flaccus, 65-27 a.
give a cursory survey of the life, career and works of Quintus Horatius Flaccus
Try telling students about the Roman poet Quintus Horatius Flaccus aka Horace (65-8 B.
35 Bangor Quintus Horatius Flaccus (December 8, 65BC - November 27, 8BC), known in the English-speaking world as Horace, was the leading Roman lyric poet during the time of Augustus.
Catullus, was a Republican poet who was probably born around 84 BCE and who died around 54 BCE, while Quintus Horatius Flaccus (known in the English-speaking world as "Horace") wrote later during the reign of Augustus, he was born in 65 BCE and died in 8 BCE.
For Quintus Horatius Flaccus (De arte poetica, verses 333 [pounds sterling]) literature has the two main goals of instruction and delight: "aut prodesse volunt auf delectare poetae ant simul et mcunda et idonea dicere vitae" (Poetry shall instruct and please, create communication pleasures and combine what is agreeable and useful for our life).
The The Carmina by Roman poet Quintus Horatius Flaccus (65-8 BC) have been translated many times into English, but Kaimowitz, head librarian of the Watkinson Library at Trinity College, Connecticut, and a classical scholar specializing in Roman poetry, presents a metrical version to bring something new to the inimitable lyric poems.
This notion can be traced back to the sixth poem of the second book of Satires, or Sermones, of Quintus Horatius Flaccus (65 B.