Horse apple


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Horse apple

Fruit of the Osage orange (bois d’arc) tree.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The Spitzbergen and the Virgina Beauty refer to their places of origin; the Horse apple is so big and sour that it is considered fit only as feed for horses; the Umbertwig was named for the distinctive shape and flexible limbs of the parent tree.
The tree is also known as osage plum, osage apple, bodark, hedge apple, and horse apple.
Even the bodock ball, or horse apple, is sliced, cured, and used.
As he did so, his foot slipped on a fresh horse apple, and striving to save himself, he yanked that shift level.
When it swung into gear, he fell back and let out a yell that scared the team, and they took off like 60, with that spreader's beater a-whirlin' and the horse apples a-flying.
Little-known varieties with unusual names like Rambo, York, Albemarle Pippin, Spitzenburg, Yates, Mountain Boomer, Mammoth Black Twig, Hog Sweet, Ralls Janet, Horse Apple, and Buckingham.
Horse Apple Origin uncertain, probably North Carolina.
As an expat, it does you a world of good, to return to your 'homeland' and smell the roses as well as the horse apples, for it enables you to contemplate, and appreciate, both that which you have in your adopted home, and what you left behind.
And Phil Nast, at Syracuse University, commenting on our "Stuff and Nonsense" VERBATIM XXIX/3) felicitously draws our attention to "horse badorties, which became the name of the principal character in William Kotzwinkle's The Fan Man, but which I understood to mean horse apples ...
(I was almost clobbered by one in my landlord's yard a few weeks ago.) "Bodock," he said, "but we also call them Horse Apples." On the Internet I then located a fact sheet from the Center for Wood Anatomy Research.