Horse collar


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horse collar

Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms. US Department of Defense 2005.

Horse collar

A band of leather or cloth stuffed with straw or sawdust that fits around a horse’s or mule’s neck, rests against the animal’s shoulders, and presents a broad, firm, load-bearing surface to the shoulders.
1001 Words and Phrases You Never Knew You Didn’t Know by W.R. Runyan Copyright © 2011 by W.R. Runyan
Translations
sangle de sauvetage
References in classic literature ?
In their quietest times, they sang ballads and told tales, for the edification of their pious visitors; or perplexed them with juggling tricks; or grinned at them through horse collars; and when sport itself grew wearisome, they made game of their own stupidity, and began a yawning match.
On a 12-yard rushing gain, Broncos safety Darian Stewart appeared to grab Kupp's facemask and was called for a horse collar as he brought Kupp down along the Rams' sideline. 
Contestants put their heads through a horse collar, and "snarl like a dog, look savage, and distort their faces".
Hopefuls put their head through a horse collar before 'giving it the gurn'.
First held in 1267, contestants have to pull a grotesque face through a horse collar, known as a braffin, and has previously attracted contestants from all over the world.
Dennis is no fan of horses ("I don't like horses even little bit," he readily admits) but he's kept his granddad's horse collar and displays it on an antique harness holder "that tripped my trigger." It's all part of a collection that honors the history of Dennis' farm.
Features include a powerful Ford V8 engine, automatic transmission, Superior chrome and classic horse collar grill.
A woven straw horse collar, made and donated by Jenny Pritchard, will be auctioned and there will be a guess-the-horse's-weight competition.
Now contestants frame their head in a fetching horse collar and pull their most frightful faces while keeping fingers crossed the wind doesn't change.
With the threat of lawsuits, often the insurance companies would agree to pay to correct facial wasting or fat deposits on the neck ("buffalo hump") and under the chin ("horse collar"), but "what we found was that insurance companies would avoid being sued by giving in, but they were going on and denying everybody else," Klein explained.