hortus siccus


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hortus siccus

(ˈhɔːtəs ˈsɪkəs)
n
(Botany) a less common name for herbarium
[C17: Latin, literally: dry garden]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in classic literature ?
I'm afraid I know nothing of the theory of it, but I keep his Hortus Siccus in order.
Viscount Valentia, the British aristocrat-traveller, in his account of a visit to the Tanjore court in 1804, described Serfoji's drawing-room, where he saw a collection of plant paintings and a hortus siccus (a collection of dried specimens), as "furnished with English chairs and tables; and on the latter were paper, colours and every implement of drawing, another amusement of which he is very fond".
I have, I am afraid, been guilty of seizing on both the large Hortus Siccus, as also the small one.
That she took the hortus siccus 'as coolly as possible' shows Molloy was far from thinking it a mistake.
I doubt whether religion would reap all the benefits which the calculating divine computes from this "great company of preachers." It would certainly be a valuable addition of nondescripts to the ample collection of known classes, genera and species, which at present beautify the hortus siccus of dissent.(13)
and then he [Coleridge] fell plump, ten thousand fathoms down (but his wings saved him harmless) into the hortus siccus of Dissent.' Hazlitt in this portrait describes the wide-ranging intellectual adventures of Coleridge, of whom he has spoken throughout as an intrepid winged explorer aspiring to soaring heights but not less subject to sickening plunges (e.g.
The meadows and forests are a hortus siccus. The leaves and grasses stand perfectly pressed by the air without screw or gum, and the birds' nests are not hung on an artificial twig, but where they builded them.