hostile takeover

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hostile takeover

n.
An acquisition of a firm despite resistance by the target firm's management and board of directors.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hostile takeover - a takeover that is resisted by the management of the target company
takeover - a change by sale or merger in the controlling interest of a corporation
Translations
feindliche Übernahme
敵対的買収
References in periodicals archive ?
The "red in tooth and claw" world of hostile takeovers does not create fitter firms, according to economists.
Many of them returned some of the profits to their stockholders through increased dividend payments or repurchases of their own stocks, in a bid to respond to growing shareholder awareness and to forestall possible hostile takeovers.
However out-in MandAs (MandAs of domestic companies by foreign companies) and especially hostile takeovers remain few today in Japan.
There are two investors who hold 14.9 percent in the company, and it had recently taken a poison pill." It was mentioned in the report that a poison pill is a strategy used by corporations to discourage hostile takeovers. With a poison pill, the target company attempts to make its stock less attractive to the acquirer.
Qantas Airways Ltd, whose share prices have dropped significantly, is said to be building a team of banks and key executive management to prevent any hostile takeovers.
The bid, however, has been turned down twice by the target company, which also adopted a poison pill to avoid hostile takeovers.
WEST Midland campaigners have part-won their long-running battle for a new "Cadbury Law" to clampdown on hostile takeovers following Kraft's pounds 11.7 billion swoop on the chocolate maker.
He called on the Government to introduce legislation making it harder for hostile takeovers to succeed, for example by ensuring that two-thirds of shareholders must agree to any deal.
Jack Dromey, Unite's deputy general secretary, who was to give evidence to the committee today, was to call for a "Cadbury's Law" aimed at preventing hostile takeovers of British companies which are not in the public interest.
Professor David Bailey from the university's Business School has repeatedly called for the government to bring in measures giving firms more protection from hostile takeovers.
But others said the new scheme may increase hostile takeovers, with companies taking a two-step approach.
The head of the Luxembourg government, Jean-Claude Juncker, on his part, is questioning hostile takeovers as an instrument for corporate restructuring in the European Union altogether.