hot Jupiter

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Related to Hot Jupiters: FU Orionis

hot Jupiter

n.
An extrasolar gas giant planet having a mass that is equal to or greater than that of Jupiter and a high surface temperature resulting from a very close orbit with its star.
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Since it's often the exceptions that prove the rule, we are hoping that studying this planet will help us understand what makes hot Jupiters tick," Cowan added.
Since it's often the exceptions that prove the rule, we are hoping that studying this planet will help us understand what makes hot Jupiters tick," Nicolas Cowan, an astronomer at McGill University, Canada, and a co-author of a new study on the subject, said in (https://mcgill.
Just as ozone absorbs solar radiation in Earth's atmosphere, creating an inversion layer within which temperature increases with altitude, titanium oxide may play the same role in the exotic atmospheres around hot Jupiters.
By incorporating the chemical composition of planets during their formation into my model, I can not only compare the orbital elements to observations, But also their compositions, Where observations of the atmospheres of hot jupiters already exist and future observations of super-earths will reveal their atmospheric and bulk composition (e.
Astronomers believe this process happens in all hot Jupiters, but a combination of being tidally locked and extremely massive prevents the titanium oxide on Kepler-13Ab from mixing back into the dayside atmosphere.
That compound is thought to be the second-most common gas in the atmospheres of hot Jupiters, after hydrogen.
HD 189733b is among a bizarre class of planets called hot Jupiters, which orbit precariously close to their parent stars.
Hot Jupiters are giant--as big as or bigger than Jupiter--and orbit so close to their host stars that they're blazing hot.
For instance, Hot Jupiters have been found orbiting the stars 51 Cancri, Tau Bootis, and Upsilon Andromedae.
Unlike Jupiter, the so-called hot Jupiters circle astonishingly close to their host star -- so close that it typically takes fewer than three days to complete an orbit.
Astronomers have found loads of exoplanets called hot Jupiters that are believed to have roughly the same size and composition but, rather than chilling in the outer solar system, are orbiting close to their stars and are probably scorching hot.