Hotere


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Hotere

(ˈhɒtɛrɪ)
n
(Biography) Ralph. 1931–2013, New Zealand artist of Māori origin, noted esp for his minimalist Black Paintings
References in periodicals archive ?
Toss Wollaston, Don Binney, Colin McCahon, Pat Hanly, Ralph Hotere, Philip Trustrum and Gordon Walters were major beneficiaries.
between Colin McCahon and Ralph Hotere. He considers the mutually
Ralph Hotere and Shane Cotton, who happen to be two of Aotearoa/New Zealand's leading artists, are of Ngapuhi extraction.
Using Momaday's poem as an entry point, in the next chapter he stages multiple juxtapositions of diverse Indigenous texts across historical and geographical boundaries and across genres and media--"Sad Joke on a Marae" by Maori poet Apirana Taylor, "Tangata Whenua" by Maori hip-hop group Upper Hutt Posse, "Blood Quantum" by Native Hawaiian poet Naomi Losch, and "When I of Fish Eat" by Maori poet Rowley Habib, with illustrations by Maori artist Ralph Hotere. By exploring bilingual (English and Maori) representations of Native American and Maori experiences and realities, Allen traffics two cultural systems and features himself not only as a literary critic but as a translator, mediator, and weaver of Indigenous cultures and traditions in the transnational context.
My guide book said they were good, and an additional reason for visiting Gore was to see its collection of paintings by Ralph Hotere, the much admired Maori artist who had died just the previous week.
One immediately thinks of Ralph Hotere's iconic collaborative installation with Bill Culbert, Pathway to the sea--Aramoana 1991, and the work of the mostly Dunedin-based artists and writers in opposition to the proposed aluminium smelter that in the early 1980s threatened the Aramoana salt marsh and mudflats--now a protected wildlife sanctuary.
Ralph Hotere told me recently that he had been to the funeral of one of our old customers, Allen Percival.
While McCahon's background was Presbyterian, accompanied by a life-long grappling with Catholicism, Ralph Hotere (Te Aupouri, 1931-2013) emerged from a dense, resonant and remarkably coherent religious milieu, conditioned by both Maori and Roman Catholic influences.
He doesn't 'much regret not having written about Ralph Hotere' (among others), though you'd have thought Hotere's three seven-part 'Black Paintings' series from 1968 would have been hearty grist to his transactional mill.
A number of Maori works are included here, ranging from 'When 1 of Fish Eat' by Rowley Habib/Rore Hapipi with illustrations by Ralph Hotere, to Upper Hutt Posse's 'Tangata Whenua'.
Gow declared there would have been far more national relevance in selecting 'a paua shell work by Ralph Hotere and Bill Culbert'.