navigation

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Related to House Navigation System: navigator, seamanship, navigation app

nav·i·ga·tion

 (năv′ĭ-gā′shən)
n.
1. The theory and practice of navigating, especially the charting of a course for a ship or aircraft.
2. Travel or traffic by vessels, especially commercial shipping.

nav′i·ga′tion·al adj.
nav′i·ga′tion·al·ly adv.

navigation

(ˌnævɪˈɡeɪʃən)
n
1. (Navigation) the skill or process of plotting a route and directing a ship, aircraft, etc, along it
2. (Navigation) the act or practice of navigating: dredging made navigation of the river possible.
3. (Nautical Terms) rare US ship traffic; shipping
4. (Physical Geography) dialect Midland English an inland waterway; canal
ˌnaviˈgational adj

nav•i•ga•tion

(ˌnæv ɪˈgeɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the act or process of navigating.
2. the art or science of plotting, ascertaining, or directing the course of a ship, aircraft, spacecraft, etc.
[1520–30; < Latin nāvigātiō a voyage. See navigate, -tion]
nav`i•ga′tion•al, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.navigation - the guidance of ships or airplanes from place to placenavigation - the guidance of ships or airplanes from place to place
steering, guidance, direction - the act of setting and holding a course; "a new council was installed under the direction of the king"
instrument flying - navigation of an airplane solely by instruments
astronavigation, celestial navigation - navigating according to the positions of the stars
dead reckoning - navigation without the aid of celestial observations
bear down on, bear down upon - sail towards another vessel, of a ship
luff, point - sail close to the wind
weather - sail to the windward of
boat - ride in a boat on water
steam, steamer - travel by means of steam power; "The ship steamed off into the Pacific"
yacht - travel in a yacht
sail - travel on water propelled by wind; "I love sailing, especially on the open sea"; "the ship sails on"
beat - sail with much tacking or with difficulty; "The boat beat in the strong wind"
scud, rack - run before a gale
outpoint - sail closer to the wind than
wear round, tack - turn into the wind; "The sailors decided to tack the boat"; "The boat tacked"
wear ship - turn away from the wind; "The sailors decided it was time to wear ship"
ferry - travel by ferry
ferry - transport by ferry
ferry - transport from one place to another
raft - transport on a raft; "raft wood down a river"
barge - transport by barge on a body of water
2.navigation - ship traffic; "the channel will be open to navigation as soon as the ice melts"
shipping, transport, transportation - the commercial enterprise of moving goods and materials
3.navigation - the work of a sailornavigation - the work of a sailor      
leg - (nautical) the distance traveled by a sailing vessel on a single tack
cabotage - navigation in coastal waters
tacking, tack - (nautical) the act of changing tack
employment, work - the occupation for which you are paid; "he is looking for employment"; "a lot of people are out of work"
steerage, steering - the act of steering a ship
accommodation ladder - (nautical) a portable ladder hung over the side of a vessel to give access to small boats alongside
becket - (nautical) a short line with an eye at one end and a knot at the other; used to secure loose items on a ship
bilge well - (nautical) a well where seepage drains to be pumped away
bitter end - (nautical) the inboard end of a line or cable especially the end that is wound around a bitt
chip - a triangular wooden float attached to the end of a log line
deadeye - (nautical) a round hardwood disk with holes and a grooved perimeter used to tighten a shroud
escutcheon - (nautical) a plate on a ship's stern on which the name is inscribed
jack ladder, pilot ladder, Jacob's ladder - (nautical) a hanging ladder of ropes or chains supporting wooden or metal rungs or steps
laniard, lanyard - (nautical) a line used for extending or fastening rigging on ships
lead line, sounding line - (nautical) plumb line for determining depth
luff - (nautical) the forward edge of a fore-and-aft sail that is next to the mast
overhead - (nautical) the top surface of an enclosed space on a ship
ratlin, ratline - (nautical) a small horizontal rope between the shrouds of a sailing ship; they form a ladder for climbing aloft
rudder - (nautical) steering mechanism consisting of a hinged vertical plate mounted at the stern of a vessel
sea ladder, sea steps - (nautical) ladder to be lowered over a ship's side for coming aboard
mainsheet, weather sheet, shroud, tack, sheet - (nautical) a line (rope or chain) that regulates the angle at which a sail is set in relation to the wind
spun yarn - (nautical) small stuff consisting of a lightweight rope made of several rope yarns loosely wound together
stay - (nautical) brace consisting of a heavy rope or wire cable used as a support for a mast or spar
sternpost - (nautical) the principal upright timber at the stern of a vessel
fireroom, stokehold, stokehole - (nautical) chamber or compartment in which the furnaces of a ship are stoked or fired
towing line, towing rope, towline, towrope - (nautical) a rope used in towing
capsizing - (nautical) the event of a boat accidentally turning over in the water
beam-ends - (nautical) at the ends of the transverse deck beams of a vessel; "on her beam-ends" means heeled over on the side so that the deck is almost vertical
ship's bell, bell - (nautical) each of the eight half-hour units of nautical time signaled by strokes of a ship's bell; eight bells signals 4:00, 8:00, or 12:00 o'clock, either a.m. or p.m.
steerageway - (nautical) the minimum rate of motion needed for a vessel to be maneuvered
stand out - steer away from shore, of ships
starboard - turn to the right, of helms or rudders
fore - situated at or toward the bow of a vessel
rigged - fitted or equipped with necessary rigging (sails and shrouds and stays etc)
unrigged - stripped of rigging
close to the wind - nearly opposite to the direction from which wind is coming; "sailing close to the wind"

navigation

noun sailing, cruising, steering, manoeuvring, voyaging, seamanship, helmsmanship Pack ice was becoming a threat to navigation.
Translations
مِلاحَه
navigacenavigační umění
navigation
siglingafræîi
navigácia
navigacija
seyretmeseyrüsefer

navigation

[ˌnævɪˈgeɪʃən]
A. N
1. (= act) [of ship, plane] → navegación f
to do the navigation (Aut) → hacer de copiloto
2. (= science) → náutica f, navegación f
B. CPD navigation lights NPL (on ship) → luces fpl de navegación; (in harbour) → baliza f

navigation

[ˌnævɪˈgeɪʃən] nnavigation f

navigation

n
(= act of navigating)Navigation f
(= shipping)Schiffsverkehr m
(= skill: in ship, plane) → Navigation f; how’s your navigation? (in car) → bist du als Beifahrer gut zu gebrauchen?; his navigation was lousy, we got lost (in car) → er hat mich so schlecht dirigiert, dass wir uns verirrt haben

navigation

:
navigation channel
n (Naut) → Fahrwasser nt
navigation law
nSchifffahrtsregelung f
navigation light
nPositionslicht ntor -lampe f
navigation system
n (Tech, Aut) → Navigationssystem nt

navigation

[ˌnævɪˈgeɪʃn] nnavigazione f

navigate

(ˈnӕvigeit) verb
1. to direct, guide or move (a ship, aircraft etc) in a particular direction. He navigated the ship through the dangerous rocks.
2. to find or follow one's route when in a ship, aircraft, car etc. If I drive will you navigate?
ˈnavigable adjective
(negative unnavigable) able to be travelled along. a navigable river.
ˌnaviˈgation noun
the art or skill of navigating.
ˈnavigator noun
a person who navigates.