houseleek

(redirected from House-leek)

house·leek

 (hous′lēk′)
n.
Any of various succulent plants of the genus Sempervivum of Eurasia, having leaves arranged in rosettes and pinkish flowers, especially the common houseleek (S. tectorum). Houseleeks are often cultivated as garden plants and have traditionally been grown on roofs in Europe. Also called live-forever, sempervivum.

houseleek

(ˈhaʊsˌliːk)
n
(Plants) any Old World crassulaceous plant of the genus Sempervivum, esp S. tectorum, which has a rosette of succulent leaves and pinkish flowers: grows on walls. Also called: hen-and-chickens

house•leek

(ˈhaʊsˌlik)

n.
a succulent plant, Sempervivum tectorum, of the stonecrop family, native to Europe, having reddish flowers and leaves forming dense basal rosettes.
[1325–75]
Translations
References in classic literature ?
The ridge of the cottage roof was usually a bright green with its overgrowth of mosses and house-leeks, and the thatch was brown as a chestnut shell, but just now it seemed to be powdered with a golden dust.
What is the general English name for the plants, including cacti and house-leeks, that are found in dry climates and have fleshy leaves and stems adapted to store water?