housefront

housefront

(ˈhaʊsˌfrʌnt)
n
(Architecture) the façade of a house
References in periodicals archive ?
The unassuming housefront which conceals the hidden garden ROB BROWNE
Even the front curtain is of a mock Tudor housefront while designer Christopher Woods's extravagant set has the right wallpaper and, naturally, a trio of flying ducks on the wall.
I went through a compound, came out at the housefront, and found him there, waiting.
The complexity of the natural world, with its multiplicity of leaves and grasses, and its prismatic reflections, offered him a compelling reason to indulge his horror vacui--his apparently unappeasable desire to subdivide and embellish --so that when he translates a view of a housefront overgrown with ivy or an expanse of trees into a green mosaic, the result seems logical and personal, instead of purely willful, as it does in his overwrought figure paintings.
Better are the comparatively subtle symbols of the production design -- rose petals scattered like drops of blood on the stark white porch, a housefront divided into abstract pieces.
(23) Adopting the first-person voice of Achterberg's protagonist (referring in the following passage to the You he seeks), Coetzee writes that 'there is between us a bar (the housefronts)....
Landsman describes it for us in some detail: "Half a dozen crooked lanes tumble into it, following paths first laid down by long vanished Ukrainian goats or aurochs, past housefronts that are faithful copies of lost Ukrainian originals" (106).
Here he is writing about a wait for a bus in Aksaray: "So decayed were these housefronts on the lane that they looked more like mud cliffs than buildings, their windows such holes as martins might nest in, and the waiting-room like a cave quarried out of crumbling stone." And here he is risking a reluctant meal in Kayseri while waiting for a bus to Erzurum: "I found a greasy eating-shop where men...scooped meat and juice into their mouths with wedges of bread.
Some housefronts were smashed, smoke was rising from several areas and gunfire rang out constantly across the city.
hidden away behind the paintless wooden housefronts" (Backward 294).
were merchants." Illustrating the regal and emulous splendor with which such men displayed their riches, he quotes The History of Italy (1549), by William Thomas, who found the housefronts on the Grand Canal "more like the doings of princes than private men." (10) However, McPherson does not note how intrigued, even troubled, early modern English writers seem to have been by the way many Venetians combined an income derived from trade with the possession of gentlemanly or noble status--characteristics that, in England, were theoretically incompatible.
Gaudy flashing lights, dodgy Slade singles, and plastic Santas glued to housefronts - all have become festive fixtures along with the more old-fashioned mistletoe and mulled wine.