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Howe

 (hou), Elias 1819-1867.
American inventor and manufacturer who designed early sewing machines (1845 and 1846) and subsequently won patent-infringement suits against a number of manufacturers, including Isaac M. Singer.

Howe

, Gordon Known as "Gordie." 1928-2016.
Canadian hockey player. A right wing who played mainly for the Detroit Red Wings (1946-1971), he led the National Hockey League in scoring six times and holds the all-time record for most games played (1,767).

Howe

, Irving 1920-1993.
American social critic and editor who founded the magazine Dissent (1953).

Howe

, Julia Ward 1819-1910.
American writer and feminist who was active in the women's suffrage movement. She wrote "Battle Hymn of the Republic" (1862) and edited Woman's Journal (1870-1890).

Howe

, Richard Earl Howe. 1726-1799.
British admiral who conducted naval operations in America (1776-1778) and defeated the French at Ushant (1794).

Howe

, Sir William Fifth Viscount Howe. 1729-1814.
British general in America. Although he defeated George Washington in a number of battles, he could not force a surrender and returned to England in 1778.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

howe

(haʊ)
n
(Physical Geography) dialect Scot and Northern English a depression in the earth's surface, such as a basin or valley
[C16: from hole]

Howe

(haʊ)
n
1. (Biography) Elias. 1819–67, US inventor of the sewing machine (1846)
2. (Biography) Gordon, known as Gordie. born 1928, US ice-hockey player, who scored1071 goals in a professional career lasting 32 years.
3. (Biography) Howe of Aberavon, Baron, title of (Richard Edward) Geoffrey Howe. born 1926, British Conservative politician; Chancellor of the Exchequer (1979–83); foreign secretary (1983–89); deputy prime minister (1989–90)
4. (Biography) Richard, 4th Viscount Howe. 1726–99, British admiral: served (1776–78) in the War of American Independence and commanded the Channel fleet against France, winning the Battle of the Glorious First of June (1794)
5. (Biography) his brother, William, 5th Viscount Howe. 1729–1814, British general; commander in chief (1776–78) of British forces in the War of American Independence
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Howe

(haʊ)

n.
1. Elias, 1819–67, U.S. inventor of the sewing machine.
2. Irving, 1920–93, U.S. social historian and literary critic.
3. Julia Ward, 1819–1910, U.S. writer and reformer.
4. William, 5th Viscount, 1729–1814, British general in the American Revolutionary War.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Howe - United States editor (1920-1993)
2.Howe - Canadian hockey player who holds the record for playing the most games (born 1928)
3.Howe - United States feminist who was active in the women's suffrage movement (1819-1910)Howe - United States feminist who was active in the women's suffrage movement (1819-1910)
4.Howe - United States inventor who built early sewing machines and won suits for patent infringement against other manufacturers (including Isaac M. Singer) (1819-1867)Howe - United States inventor who built early sewing machines and won suits for patent infringement against other manufacturers (including Isaac M. Singer) (1819-1867)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in classic literature ?
It had many openings and ferny howes; and a road or bridle track ran north and south through the midst of it, by the edge of which, where was a spring, I sat down to eat some oat-bread of Mr.
These bunches have since been named rather aptly, by that distinguished anatomist, Professor Howes, the HANDS.
From this station, as I pleased myself with imagining, Gage may have beheld his disastrous victory on Bunker Hill (unless one of the tri-mountains intervened), and Howe have marked the approaches of Washington's besieging army; although the buildings since erected in the vicinity have shut out almost every object, save the steeple of the Old South, which seems almost within arm's length.
The officers of the British army, and the loyal gentry of the province, most of whom were collected within the beleaguered town, had been invited to a masked ball; for it was the policy of Sir William Howe to hide the distress and danger of the period, and the desperate aspect of the siege, under an ostentation of festivity.
Some surprise had been expressed that a person of Colonel Joliffe's known Whig principles, though now too old to take an active part in the contest, should have remained in Boston during the siege, and especially that he should consent to show himself in the mansion of Sir William Howe. But thither he had come, with a fair granddaughter under his arm; and there, amid all the mirth and buffoonery, stood this stern old figure, the best sustained character in the masquerade, because so well representing the antique spirit of his native land.
If one leaves Meringe Lagoon, on Ysabel, and steers a course due north, magnetic, at the end of one hundred and fifty miles he will lift the pounded coral beaches of Lord Howe above the sea.
Lord Howe has been populated by the westward Polynesian drift which continues to this day, big outrigger canoes being washed upon its beaches by the southeast trade.
Howe. There are not many persons, I hope and believe, who, after reading these passages, can ever hear that name with indifference.
Howe, since the report from which I have just quoted.
"General Gage had been recalled to England, and was succeeded by Sir William Howe. The British army and the inhabitants of Boston were now in great distress.
Sir William Howe made preparations to cross over in boats and drive the Americans from their batteries, but was prevented by a violent gale and storm.
By the reception that the public gave to his telephone, he learned to sympathize with Howe, whose first sewing-machine was smashed by a Boston mob; with McCormick, whose first reaper was called "a cross between an Astley chariot, a wheelbarrow, and a flying- machine"; with Morse, whom ten Congresses regarded as a nuisance; with Cyrus Field, whose Atlantic Cable was denounced as "a mad freak of stubborn ignorance"; and with Westinghouse, who was called a fool for proposing "to stop a railroad train with wind."