Howland Island


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Howland Island

(ˈhaʊlənd)
n
(Placename) a small island in the central Pacific, near the equator northwest of Phoenix Island: US airfield. Area: 2.6 sq km (1 sq mile)
References in periodicals archive ?
amp;nbsp;Earhart and Noonan departed Lae, Papua New Guinea, for Howland Island on July 2, 1937.
1a), including Jarvis Island (0[degrees]22'S, 160[degrees]01'W), Howland Island (0[degrees]48'N, 176[degrees]37'W), Baker Island (0[degrees]12'N, 176[degrees]29'W), and Kanton Island (2[degrees]50'S, 171[degrees]40'W), support healthy, resilient coral reef ecosystems characterized by exceptionally high biomass of planktivorous and piscivorous reef fishes due to the combined effects of equatorial and topographic upwelling (Gove et al.
Residents on Baker Island and Howland Island will have to wait to pull their party poppers until 12pm (GMT), a whole 12 hours after revellers in the UK have celebrated the turn of the year.
Eighty years ago this month American aviator Amelia Earhart and her navigator, Fred Noonan, disappeared while trying to find tiny Howland Island, a dot in the Pacific Ocean.
1937: Amelia Earhart Putnam, American aviator, and co-pilot Fred Noonan were lost near Howland Island in the Pacific.
Some regions of the US, including Baker Island and Howland Island, will be the last places to welcome 2016 at 8 p.
Researchers of The International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery (TIGHAR) believe that Earhart and her navigator, Fred Noonan, may have made a forced landing on Nikumaroro's smooth, flat coral reef becoming castaways and eventually dying on the atoll, some 350 miles southeast of Howland Island.
Rebuilt Howland Island Bridge in Northern Montezuma WMA to provide access for hunting, fishing and other outdoor recreation.
Amelia, however, is popularly known for her mysterious disappearance over the central Pacific Ocean near Howland Island in1937 during an attempt to make circumnavigational flight of the globe.
The holder of several aeronautical records -- including the first woman to cross the Atlantic by air -- Earhart had set off from New Guinea to refuel at Howland Island for a final long-distance hop to California.
That area has long been believed a possible crash site - as has Howland Island, about 400 miles away, where a fueling stop was to have occurred.