Hox gene


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Hox gene

 (hŏks)
n.
Any of a group of homeobox genes that exist as clusters in animals, especially in vertebrates, and determine the identity and locations of body parts along the anterior-posterior body axis in a developing fetus or larva.

[From h(omeob)ox.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pediatric acute myeloid leukemia with NPM1 mutations is characterized by a gene expression profile with dysregulated HOX gene expression distinct from MLL-rearranged leukemias.
Jares et al., "Gene expression profiling of acute myeloid leukemia with translocation t(8;16)(p11;p13) and MYST3-CREBBP rearrangement reveals a distinctive signature with a specific pattern of HOX gene expression," Cancer Research, vol.
Patterning of the shapes of the different vertebrae is regulated by HOX GENES. So, probably mutation of HOX GENE leads to sacralization of coccygeal vertebra [4].
Hoxal3null mice have agenesis of the caudal portion of the Mullerian duct, and Hoxdl3 (homeobox Dl3)-null mice that also lack one copv of Hoxal3 exhibit severe malformations of the vagina and external genitalia, suggesting critical roles for these Hox gene paralogs in posterior FRT development (Frornental-Ramain etal.
Under the direction of Duboule and Daniel Noordermeer, the team analyzed thousands of Hox gene spools.
For example, studies have revealed that posterior shifts in the expression boundary of the Hox gene Ultrabithorax (Uhx) led to the evolution of maxillipeds, which have morphologically and functionally specialized anterior thoracic appendages for feeding (Averof and Patel, 1997; Abzhanov and Kaufman, 1999, 2000).
These genes have remained relatively unchanged throughout evolutionary history, and the complex may have evolved from a single ancestral hox gene.
Reports showed that HOX gene plays a very important role not only in embryonic development but in vascular repair, angiogenesis, and tumor metastasis after birth [10, 11].
The following chapter discusses the expression of the HOX gene network by real-time PCR.
Perhaps the most widely known example of the conservation of these genes is that of the Hox gene complex.
"But what was surprising to us in this study was that a single Hox gene acts as a global organizer of motor neurons and their connections.