human capital

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Related to Human Capital Theory: Human Capital Management

human capital

n.
The accumulated knowledge and skills that make a workforce productive: "Individuals and nations become rich by investing in human capital" (Ben Stein).

human capital

n
(Economics) economics the abilities and skills of any individual, esp those acquired through investment in education and training, that enhance potential income earning
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Human capital theory is applied to explain why students and parents decide to participate in extended education programs.
According to human capital theory, employees invest in skills which lead them to greater employability in the marketplace (Forrier, Verbruggen, and De Cuyper, 2015; Ackah and Heaton, 2004).
(1) For discussion of how human capital theory has impacted labor economics, see Mincer (1974), Becker (1994), and Goldin (2016).
Although five articles did not specify the theories from which their studies were derived (Temtime & Pansiri, 2004; Aldaba, 2012; Tambunan, 2008; Lee, 2006; Abdullah, 1999), other authors used Human Capital Theory (Chidi & Shadare, 2011), Dynamic Capabilities View (Daou, Karuranga & Su, 2013), Resource-based View (Greenidge et.
Human capital theory and the resource-based view are two theoretical perspectives that provide rationale for a positive relationship between human capital and organizational performance.
The most favoured discourse in New Zealand currently, Human capital theory, is characterized by talk of "investment." Its great proponents are Ludwig von Mises (e.g.
Human capital theory brings education closer to the logic of market competition, constituting the logic of self-governance based on economic costs and benefits.
In order to find the factors that would be suitable as a basis for determining wages, the authors have used the methodological principles of the human capital theory. Considering the studies listed in Table 1, and numerous other developments in this field, it is clear that such HC characteristics as education and work experience are the most important factors which determine the value of interest for human capital use and can illustrate the differences between the expectations of employers regarding the efficiency of human capital.
According to Human Capital Theory (Becker 1964; Cain 1976; Ehrenberg and Smith 1991), workers undertake three major kinds of investments: education and training, migration, and search for new jobs.
The human capital theory assumes that an individual's level of human capital is positively associated with income (Becker, 1962; Mincer, 1974).
A flexible method to check wage differentials among different groups of workers is through the human capital theory (Becker, 1964; Mincer, 1958; 1974) according to which the rise in accumulation of human capital (i.e.
Drawing on human capital theory (Becker 1964; Flamholtz and Lacey 1981), the purpose of this article is to: (i) assess perceived generic-skill development or acquisition among PhD graduates from Australian higher education institutions; (ii) measure the perceived importance of skills transfer to PhD graduates' post-degree employment; and (iii) identify the influence of certain work characteristics, individual work experience, and discipline on the perceived importance and actual development of generic skills among PhD graduates.

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