human shield

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human shield

n.
1. A person who volunteers or is forced to take up a position at a likely military target as a means of forestalling an enemy attack.
2. A person who is used as a shield by someone in a confrontation with the police in order to prevent capture.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
menschlicher Schutzschild
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References in periodicals archive ?
In this paper, we use Israel/Palestine as a case study to examine the politics of human shielding, while focusing on the epistemic and political operations through which the deployment of the legal category of human shield legitimizes the use of lethal force.
But in spite of the similarities between inanimate and animate shields, three crucial distinctions need to be stressed in order to understand the specificity of human shielding.
The central category of civilian in IHL (Kinsella, 2011) is, in other words, the condition of possibility of human shielding.
In this sense, the politics of human shielding is fundamentally a politics of vulnerability: a form of politics in which vulnerability occupies a central position in the definition of the relationship between political actors within the battlefield and the meaning of violence.
Third, unlike a violation of Article 58, a violation of the prohibition on human shielding constitutes a war crime and will lead to individual criminal responsibility.
Whereas the issue of fighting from within civilian population centers and utilization of human shields during armed conflict are burning issues in modern armed conflicts, the case law on human shielding is relatively sparse.
(137) In our proposed formula, the warning serves additional functions related to the human shielding tactic.
In contrast with this minimal attention given to allegations about Hamas, in finding Israel guilty of four instances of alleged human shielding, the report allocated seventy-five paragraphs consisting of lengthy descriptions based solely upon the testimony of the accusers, which the report found credible.