whipworm

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whip·worm

 (wĭp′wûrm′, hwĭp′-)
n.
Any of several slender, whip-shaped, parasitic nematode worms of the genus Trichuris that infest the intestines of mammals, especially T. trichiura, which causes trichuriasis in humans.

whipworm

(ˈwɪpˌwɜːm)
n
(Animals) any of several parasitic nematode worms of the genus Trichuris, esp T. trichiura, having a whiplike body and living in the intestines of mammals

whip•worm

(ˈʰwɪpˌwɜrm, ˈwɪp-)

n.
any of several parasitic nematodes of the genus Trichuris, having a long, slender, whiplike anterior end.
[1870–75]
Translations

whipworm

n tricocéfalo
References in periodicals archive ?
The human whipworm (Trichuris) infects around 1 billion people worldwide and causes a disease (trichuriasis) that results in major socioeconomic loses.
Ingestion of this helminth, which is similar to the human whipworm, causes a short-term colonization in the human gastrointestinal tract.
Several years ago, the team treated severely ill IBD patients with the eggs of worms, specifically Trichuris suis (or pig whipworm), which is similar to the human whipworm.