Hume


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Hume

 (hyo͞om), David 1711-1776.
British philosopher and historian whose skeptical arguments concerning induction, causation and religion, including the thesis that human knowledge arises only from sense experience, shaped 19th- and 20th-century empiricist philosophy. His works include A Treatise of Human Nature (1739-1740) and History of England (1754-1762).

Hume

, John born 1937.
Politician of Northern Ireland. Head of the Social Democratic and Labour Party since 1979, Hume shared the 1998 Nobel Peace Prize with David Trimble for working to establish peace in Northern Ireland.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Hume

(hjuːm)
n
1. (Biography) (George) Basil. 1923–99, English Roman Catholic Benedictine monk and cardinal; archbishop of Westminster (1976–99)
2. (Biography) David. 1711–76, Scottish empiricist philosopher, economist, and historian, whose sceptic philosophy restricted human knowledge to that which can be perceived by the senses. His works include A Treatise of Human Nature (1740), An Enquiry concerning the Principles of Morals (1751), Political Discourses (1752), and History of England (1754–62)
3. (Biography) John. born 1937, Northern Ireland politician; leader of the Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP) (1979–2001). Nobel peace prize jointly with David Trimble in 1998
ˈHumism n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Hume

(hyum; often yum)

n.
David, 1711–76, Scottish philosopher and historian.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Hume - Scottish philosopher whose sceptical philosophy restricted human knowledge to that which can be perceived by the senses (1711-1776)Hume - Scottish philosopher whose sceptical philosophy restricted human knowledge to that which can be perceived by the senses (1711-1776)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in classic literature ?
From the time of Descartes to Hume and Kant it has had little or nothing to do with facts of science.
A like remark applies to David Hume, of whose philosophy the central principle is the denial of the relation of cause and effect.
He delighted in the robust common sense of Thomas Hobbes; Spinoza filled him with awe, he had never before come in contact with a mind so noble, so unapproachable and austere; it reminded him of that statue by Rodin, L'Age d'Airain, which he passionately admired; and then there was Hume: the scepticism of that charming philosopher touched a kindred note in Philip; and, revelling in the lucid style which seemed able to put complicated thought into simple words, musical and measured, he read as he might have read a novel, a smile of pleasure on his lips.
Hume. It is history you are reading?" "Yes," said Miss Rose; without, however, adding that it was the history of Mr.
The way was partly prepared for Gibbon by two Scottish historians, his early contemporaries, the philosopher David Hume and the clergyman William Robertson, but they have little of his scientific conscientiousness.
The Bacon, the Spinoza, the Hume, Schelling, Kant, or whosoever propounds to you a philosophy of the mind, is only a more or less awkward translator of things in your consciousness which you have also your way of seeing, perhaps of denominating.
From memory it is an easy step to what are called "ideas"--not in the Platonic sense, but in that of Locke, Berkeley and Hume, in which they are opposed to "impressions." You may be conscious of a friend either by seeing him or by "thinking" of him; and by "thought" you can be conscious of objects which cannot be seen, such as the human race, or physiology.
"With the players that were in that league and to be a Canadian lad who's not played on the world stage, to get that award was a brilliant achievement for myself and something I'll look back on as one of the highlights of my career," Hume said.
En este trabajo proponemos una interpretacion creemos que original del pensamiento moral de David Hume, en particular en lo que toca a su caracter relativista, pluralista u objetivista.
Cathy Hume, Chaucer and the Cultures of Love and Marriage, Bristol Studies in Medieval Cultures, D.