hummingbird

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hum·ming·bird

 (hŭm′ĭng-bûrd′)
n.
Any of numerous birds of the family Trochilidae found throughout the Americas, usually very small in size and having brilliant iridescent plumage, a long slender bill, and wings capable of beating very rapidly, thereby enabling the bird to hover.

hummingbird

(ˈhʌmɪŋˌbɜːd)
n
(Animals) any very small American bird of the family Trochilidae, having a brilliant iridescent plumage, long slender bill, and wings specialized for very powerful vibrating flight: order Apodiformes

hum•ming•bird

(ˈhʌm ɪŋˌbɜrd)

n.
any of numerous tiny, usu. colorful New World birds of the family Trochilidae, having a long, slender bill for sipping nectar and narrow wings that beat very rapidly, enabling the bird to hover at a flower or dart in any direction.
[1625–35, Amer.; so called from the noise made by the wings]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hummingbird - tiny American bird having brilliant iridescent plumage and long slender billshummingbird - tiny American bird having brilliant iridescent plumage and long slender bills; wings are specialized for vibrating flight
apodiform bird - nonpasserine bird having long wings and weak feet; spends much of its time in flight
Archilochus colubris - a kind of hummingbird
thornbill - any of various South American hummingbirds with a sharp pointed bill
Translations
kolibřík
koliber

hummingbird

[ˈhʌmɪŋbɜːd] Ncolibrí m, picaflor m

hummingbird

[ˈhʌmɪŋbɜːrd] ncolibri m, oiseau-mouche m

hummingbird

[ˈhʌmɪŋˌbɜːd] ncolibrì m inv
References in classic literature ?
Instead of the white lily, which requires mud, or the common sweet flag, the blue flag (Iris versicolor) grows thinly in the pure water, rising from the stony bottom all around the shore, where it is visited by hummingbirds in June; and the color both of its bluish blades and its flowers and especially their reflections, is in singular harmony with the glaucous water.
Valparaiso -- Excursion to the Foot of the Andes -- Structure of the Land -- Ascend the Bell of Quillota -- Shattered Masses of Greenstone -- Immense Valleys -- Mines -- State of Miners -- Santiago -- Hot-baths of Cauquenes -- Gold-mines -- Grinding-mills -- Perforated Stones -- Habits of the Puma -- El Turco and Tapacolo -- Hummingbirds.
IEve been thinking about hummingbirds a lot since attending the annual Hummingbird Fest in Lemont.
Unlike many other birds that frequent the garden, hummingbirds are not afraid of humans.
Hummingbirds visit our yards, looking for nourishment from our gardens and feeders.
Even casual birders will enjoy browsing the strikingly beautiful photos of hummingbirds a-wing
She includes facts on mature size, bloom season, water use, climate zone, and a brief discussion of the plantEs usefulness to hummingbirds, a description of its natural habitat, and detailed information on cultivation.
Synopsis: Over millions of years, hummingbirds and plants have co-evolved.
Elaine Henderson ASINCE we don't have indigenous hummingbirds, it is likely to be a hummingbird hawk-moth.
Synopsis: Hummingbirds and plants have co-evolved over millions of years.
Elaine Henderson, by email CAROL: Since we don't have indigenous hummingbirds, it is likely to be a hummingbird hawk-moth.
One tropical plant can even recognize long-billed hummingbirds by how the birds slurp up nectar, scientists report in the March 17 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.