humpback

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Related to Humpback Whales: Blue Whales

hump·back

 (hŭmp′băk′)
n.
1. See hunchback.
2. A humped upper back.
3. A humpback whale.

hump′backed′ adj.

humpback

(ˈhʌmpˌbæk)
n
1. (Pathology) another word for hunchback
2. (Animals) Also called: humpback whale a large whalebone whale, Megaptera novaeangliae, closely related and similar to the rorquals but with a humped back and long flippers: family Balaenopteridae
3. (Animals) a Pacific salmon, Oncorhynchus gorbuscha, the male of which has a humped back and hooked jaws
4. (Civil Engineering) Also called: humpback bridge Brit a road bridge having a sharp incline and decline and usually a narrow roadway
[C17: alteration of earlier crumpbacked, perhaps influenced by hunchback; perhaps related to Dutch homp lump]
ˈhumpˌbacked adj

hump•back

(ˈhʌmpˌbæk)

n.
1. a back that is humped in a convex position.
[1690–1700; appar. back formation from humpbacked]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.humpback - an abnormal backward curve to the vertebral columnhumpback - an abnormal backward curve to the vertebral column
spinal curvature - an abnormal curvature of the vertebral column
2.humpback - a person whose back is hunched because of abnormal curvature of the upper spine
cripple - someone who is unable to walk normally because of an injury or disability to the legs or back
3.humpback - large whalebone whale with long flippers noted for arching or humping its back as it diveshumpback - large whalebone whale with long flippers noted for arching or humping its back as it dives
baleen whale, whalebone whale - whale with plates of whalebone along the upper jaw for filtering plankton from the water
genus Megaptera, Megaptera - humpback whales
Translations
ظَهْرٌ مُحَدَّبمُحَدَّب
do obloukuhrbáč
hvælvetpukkelryg
baleine à bossebossu
eins og hnúîur, kryppu-kryppa, herîakistill
do oblúka
kamburkamburlu

humpback

[ˈhʌmpbæk] N
1. (= person) → jorobado/a m/f
to have a humpbackser jorobado
2. (= whale) (also humpback whale) → rorcual m

humpback

[ˈhʌmpbæk] nbossu(e) m/fhumpbacked bridge humpback bridge n (mainly British)dos m d'ânehumpback whale nbaleine f à bosse

humpback

n (= person)Buck(e)lige(r) mf; (= back)Buckel m

humpback

[ˈhʌmpˌbæk] n (also humpback bridge) → ponte m a schiena d'asino

hump

(hamp) noun
1. a large lump on the back of an animal, person etc. a camel's hump.
2. part of a road etc which rises and falls in the shape of a hump.
ˈhumpback noun
a back with a hump.
adjective
rising and falling in the shape of a hump. a humpback bridge.
ˈhumpbacked adjective
having a hump on the back.

humpback

n (fam o vulg) joroba
References in periodicals archive ?
Humpback whales are known to make vast migrations between their breeding and feeding grounds, and are increasingly being seen in UK seas.
Two populations of humpback whales feed during spring, summer and fall throughout a range that extends from the North Atlantic to the Gulf of Maine to Norway.
He said he was on a whale-watching boat trip on July 22 when he noticed a group of humpback whales on a feeding frenzy.
The little information that exists on the historical distribution and abundance of humpback whales in Scottish waters prior to commercial whaling indicates that they were present in low densities.
Humpback whales have been filling up before setting off to make babies around the Cape Verde Islands in the central Atlantic, the Irish Whale and Dolphin Group said.
Humpback whales are a true ecological success story.
While tens of thousands of humpback whales are estimated to live in the Atlantic Ocean off Brazil, nearly all of them have migrated south by this time of year, the summer in the Southern Hemisphere, to feed near Antarctica.
"Humpback whales don't usually travel to the north.
HUMPBACK WHALES: A DETECTIVE STORY BBC2, 9pm THIS engaging nature documentary begins with some striking footage.
Humpback whales are famed for having "dialects" unique to
The Environment Society of Oman (ESO), in partnership with New England Aquarium (NEA), recently finalised its findings on a two-year acoustic dataset on the Arabian Sea humpback whales.