Humphrey Gilbert


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Noun1.Humphrey Gilbert - English navigator who in 1583 established in Newfoundland the first English colony in North America (1539-1583)Humphrey Gilbert - English navigator who in 1583 established in Newfoundland the first English colony in North America (1539-1583)
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References in classic literature ?
This he sent to sail along with others under the command of his step-brother Sir Humphrey Gilbert, who was setting out upon a voyage of discovery.
This expedition was little more successful than Sir Humphrey Gilbert's, but nothing seemed to discourage Raleigh.
Beginning with a nuanced study of Walter Raleigh and Humphrey Gilbert, and the ways in which "God's will converged happily with what Ralegh called human 'invention,'" Haskell's study will be required reading in upper-division undergraduate and graduate courses alike on early modern politics and the fledgling Atlantic world (2).
In fact, it's Sir Humphrey Gilbert's expedition - close friend to Miles and the half-brother of Sir Walter Raleigh, who will also be joining the fleet.
"We are as near to heaven by sea as by land." -- Sir Humphrey Gilbert
Gilbert (half- brother of Sir Walter Raleigh and brother of Sir Humphrey Gilbert, the great Elizabethan explorer) designed the gardens of Wilton House for its incumbent William Herbert, third earl of Pembroke (fourth cousin and patron of George).
Nate Probasco, in "Sir Humphrey Gilbert, Elizabeth I, and the Anglo-Spanish Conflict," tells the intriguing story of Sir Humphrey Gilbert's plan for extending the queen's and England's influence in the Americas.
For the origin of this tradition, he points to the 1630s, when Thomas James exhorted his crew to put their trust in God and to remember that in the Arctic they were still "as close to heaven as we would be in England." However, it does not require a profound knowledge of 16th- and 17th-century narratives to recognize this exhortation as a deliberate echo of Sir Humphrey Gilbert's famous words, "We are as near to heaven by sea as by land." MacLaren states that James drew his inspiration from Thomas More's Utopia; actually, it was Gilbert who died with a copy of Utopia in his hands.
In 1942, she became engaged to Wing Commander Humphrey Gilbert. When she was forced to land at his base during foul weather, he removed her aircraft's spark plugs and asked her to stay to dinner.
In "Discourse on Western Planting," Hakluyt the Younger picked up on central colonial and imperial themes in texts by and surrounding Sir Humphrey Gilbert in the 1560s and 1570s (including the letters patent of June 1578).