Humphrey Davy

(redirected from Humphry Davy)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Humphrey Davy - English chemist who was a pioneer in electrochemistry and who used it to isolate elements sodium and potassium and barium and boron and calcium and magnesium and chlorine (1778-1829)Humphrey Davy - English chemist who was a pioneer in electrochemistry and who used it to isolate elements sodium and potassium and barium and boron and calcium and magnesium and chlorine (1778-1829)
References in classic literature ?
It was Sir Humphry Davy's 'Last Days of a Philosopher,' and on the first leaf was written, 'Frederick Lawrence.' I closed the book, but kept it in my hand, and stood facing the door, with my back to the fire-place, calmly waiting her arrival; for I did not doubt she would come.
THE AGE OF WONDER by Richard Holmes, HarperPress, PS14.99 A group biography of William Herschel, Humphry Davy and other great scientists.
Coleridge's oft-quoted remark that he attended the chemical lectures of Humphry Davy to renew his stock of metaphors suggests a semantic exchange between established fields of chemistry and poetry.
1778: Sir Humphry Davy, chemist and inventor of the miner's safety lamp, was born in Penzance.
The first to isolate it was Sir Humphry Davy in London in 1808, but it was French scientist Antoine Bussy who first isolated magnesium in large quantities and further studied the element.
1816British inventor Sir Humphry Davy tests his miners' safety lamp.
Covering materials and material objects, chemical governance and the governance of chemistry, and revisiting the history of production, they discuss such topics as household oeconomy and chemical inquiry, relations between the state and the chemical industry in France 1760-1800: the case of ceruse, renegotiating debt: chemical governance and money in the early 19th-century Dutch Empire, the subversive Humphry Davy: aristocracy and establishing chemical research laboratories in England during the late-18th and early 19th centuries, and relations between industry and academe in Scotland: the case of dyeing 1760-1840.
In 1802, Humphry Davy was appointed Director of the Laboratory.
William Wordsworth was so unsure of his punctuation that at the suggestion of Samuel Taylor Coleridge he sent a draft of the second edition of his Lyrical Ballads to a chemist, Humphry Davy, with this note: "You would greatly oblige me by looking over the enclosed poems and correcting anything you find amiss in the punctuation, a business at which I am ashamed to say I am no adept." Although Wordsworth had never met Davy, and knew of him only through Coleridge, he was so uncertain of his own abilities that he asked him to send the corrected manuscript directly to the printer, without referring it back to him.
At 6pm Professor of the History of Science Frank James will talk on Science and Mining in the North East which will look at the work of figures like Stephenson, Humphry Davy and Michael Faraday and the controversies surrounding them.
In 1809 Englishman Humphry Davy invented the arc lamp, and a decade later Warren De La Rue created the first sealed lightbulb.
However, at the same time that Stephenson was working on his lamp, Sir Humphry Davy was also designing one of his own.