Huntingdon


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Huntingdon

(ˈhʌntɪŋdən)
n
(Placename) a town in E central England, in Cambridgeshire: birthplace of Oliver Cromwell. Pop (with Godmanchester): 20 600 (2001)

Huntingdon

(ˈhʌntɪŋdən)
n
(Biography) Selina, Countess of Huntingdon. 1707–91, English religious leader, who founded a Calvinistic Methodist sect
References in classic literature ?
Huntingdon, the son of a late friend of my uncle's.
Huntingdon. I've heard him say, "He's a fine lad, that young Huntingdon, but a bit wildish, I fancy." So I'd have you beware.'
Huntingdon's, that he was neither a fool nor a knave, though, possibly, neither a sage nor a saint - but that is no matter to me, as I am not likely to meet him again - unless as an occasional partner in the ball-room.'
Huntingdon; for I'd rather be an old maid and a pauper than Mrs.
But are you not the only child of the late Earl of Huntingdon?"
"I am, sire, though there be some who say that Robin Hood's father was formerly the rightful Earl of Huntingdon. Nathless, neither he is advantaged nor I, for the estates are confiscate."
"Rise, Robin Fitzooth, Earl of Huntingdon!" he exclaimed, while a mighty cheer arose from the band and rent the air of the forest.
"May I obey all Your Majesty's commands as willingly!" cried the new Earl of Huntingdon, drawing the old Earl's daughter close to him.
At last the King, seeing how faithful and how loyal he was, created him Earl of Huntingdon; so Robin followed the King to the wars, and found his time so full that he had no chance to come back to Sherwood for even so much as a day.
I will not dwell upon the matter overlong, but will tell as speedily as may be of how that stout fellow, Robin Hood, died as he had lived, not at court as Earl of Huntingdon, but with bow in hand, his heart in the greenwood, and he himself a right yeoman.
Now do I lay by the name of Robert, Earl of Huntingdon, and take upon me once again that nobler title, Robin Hood, the Yeoman." At this a great shout went up, and all the yeomen shook one another's hands for joy.
But there is nought in the world so easily forgot as gratitude; so, when the Prioress of Kirklees had heard how her cousin, the Earl of Huntingdon, had thrown away his earldom and gone back again to Sherwood, she was vexed to the soul, and feared lest her cousinship with him should bring the King's wrath upon her also.