Hurkaru

Hur`ka´ru


n.1.In India, a running footman; a messenger.
References in periodicals archive ?
Gilchrist, The Oriental Fabulist; or, Polyglot Translations of Esop's and Other Ancient Fables from the English Language, into Hindoostanee, Persian, Arabic, Brij Bhakha, Bongla, and Sunskrit, in the Roman Character (Calcutta: Printed at the Hurkaru office, 1803).
The following appeared in the Bengal Hurkaru: 'If you value the blessings that shine at our hearth--/ The wife's smiling welcome, the infant's sweet mirth--/ While they charm us at eve, let us think upon those / Who have bought with their blood our domestic repose' (4 July 1857).
The local English press championed most productions: regular reviews and notices appeared in the Bengal Gazette, Bengal Hurkaru, Bengal Courier, Asiatic Journal, and Calcutta Gazette.
In 1848 the Bengal Hurkaru and India Gazette announced "the long looked for debut of a native amateur in the character of Othello," when Baishnav Charan Adhya played opposite the English Desdemona of Mrs.