domestic violence

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domestic violence

n.
Physical or emotional abuse of a household member, especially one's spouse or domestic partner.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

domes′tic vi′olence


n.
acts of violence against a member of one's immediate family, esp. in the home.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.domestic violence - violence or physical abuse directed toward your spouse or domestic partnerdomestic violence - violence or physical abuse directed toward your spouse or domestic partner; usually violence by men against women
violence, force - an act of aggression (as one against a person who resists); "he may accomplish by craft in the long run what he cannot do by force and violence in the short one"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
therefore I should be ready to accept and tolerate my husband abuse', (Respondent 55, Stratum B, 19/01/17).
She was traumatised after having watcher her husband abuse their child.
Compared to younger men, men 55 years and older are less likely report husband abuse. (27)
Hannah said that the girl would come to their house because she needed someone to talk to, but denied that she had ever inappropriately touched any of them and said that she had not seen her husband abuse any of them.
Steinmetz (1977-78) wrote of the "The Battered Husband Syndrome," Tutty (1999) discussed "Husband Abuse," and both Brothers (2001) and Pritchard (2001) wrote of the abuse of men.
This paper explores the status of husband abuse, by re-assessing relevant trends and developments in Australia and other countries, and presents a review of empirical evidence which shows that husband abuse is more common and more serious than it is generally believed to be, and that it is the task of the government to address spouse abuse by means of policies and practices which are free from a sexist bias.
Hence, it is legitimate to suggest on the basis of this study that (a) there are contexts in which the majority of aggressive wives do not hit their husband in self-defense; (b) there are cases where women use all forms of violence against their spouse and where their aggression constitutes a genuine form of DV, that is, husband abuse; (c) wives' violence against their husbands is not always a corollary of or a precondition to wife abuse but a form of DV that exists independently and deserves to be seen as such; and (d) many aggressive wives make false allegations of being the victims of DV; the fact that such allegations are taken by the authorities on their face value, without scrutiny, makes this problem even more serious.
In his text Criminology, Siegel (1992) wrote: "Spouse abuse, which involves the physical assault of a wife by a husband (though husband abuse is not unknown) has occurred throughout recorded history," and, "[I]n one-year period, the New York City police recorded 14,167 complaints involving wife abuse" (p.
Shami's wife had earlier alleged that his husband abuses her physically and mentally and was also involved in many extra-marital affairs.
Her character, Sayeda, is that of every Egyptian woman whose husband abuses, cheats on, steals from her and then toss her aside: she represents Egyptian women struggling in abusive relationships where she's the primary breadwinner and is yet mistreated and cheated on by a husband who reaps all her hard-earned gains.
If the husband abuses this right to discipline, he cannot be exempted from punishment."