phenomenology

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phe·nom·e·nol·o·gy

(fĭ-nŏm′ə-nŏl′ə-jē)
n.
1. A philosophy or method of inquiry concerned with the perception and experience of objects and events as the basis for the investigation of reality.
2. A philosophical movement based on this, originated by Edmund Husserl around 1905.

phe·nom′e·no·log′i·cal (-nə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) adj.
phe·nom′e·no·log′i·cal·ly adv.
phe·nom′e·nol′o·gist n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

phenomenology

(fɪˌnɒmɪˈnɒlədʒɪ)
n
1. (Philosophy) the movement founded by Husserl that concentrates on the detailed description of conscious experience, without recourse to explanation, metaphysical assumptions, and traditional philosophical questions
2. (Philosophy) the science of phenomena as opposed to the science of being
phenomenological adj
pheˌnomenoˈlogically adv
pheˌnomeˈnologist n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

phe•nom•e•nol•o•gy

(fɪˌnɒm əˈnɒl ə dʒi)

n.
1. the study of phenomena as distinct from ontology.
2. the branch of a field of study that classifies phenomena relevant to itself.
3. the system of Husserl and his followers stressing the description of phenomena.
[1790–1800]
phe•nom`e•no•log′i•cal (-nlˈɒdʒ ɪ kəl) adj.
phe•nom`e•no•log′i•cal•ly, adv.
phe•nom`e•nol′o•gist, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ontology, phenomenology - Ontology is the branch of metaphysics concerned with the nature or essence of being or existence, the opposite of phenomenology, the science of phenomena.
See also related terms for phenomena.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

phenomenology

1. the study of phenomena.
2. the philosophical system of Edmund Husserl and his followers, especially the careful description of phenomena in all areas of experience. — phenomenologist, n.phenomenologic, phenomenological, adj.
See also: Philosophy
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

phenomenology

A philosophical doctrine established by Husserl; the science of appearances.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.phenomenology - a philosophical doctrine proposed by Edmund Husserl based on the study of human experience in which considerations of objective reality are not taken into account
doctrine, ism, philosophical system, philosophy, school of thought - a belief (or system of beliefs) accepted as authoritative by some group or school
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

phenomenology

[fɪˈnɒmɪˈnɒlədʒɪ] Nfenomenología f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

phenomenology

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
In Husserlian phenomenology, what is trusted is the researcher's own conscious experience (Zahavi, 2003).
Patocka ranges over the whole of Husserl's output, from 'The Philosophy of Arithmetic' to 'The Crisis of the European Sciences', and traces the evolution of all the central issues of Husserlian phenomenology including: intentionality, categorial intuition, temporality, the subject-body; the concrete a priori, and transcendental subjectivity.
Manuel Maass and Miguel Equihua draw upon the philosophical methods of Husserlian phenomenology to propose a method for achieving truly trans-disciplinary research on 'socioecosystems'.
Because we tend to judge history at the level of appearances, for Heidegger "every epoch of world history" turns out to be "an epoch of error." This is so because we confuse "the emptiness of the appearance of time" with the "essence of time." (59) Husserlian phenomenology of inner time consciousness thus is at best merely formal, at worst "vulgar." Here the forgetting of perception leads Heidegger to play down the specifics of the phenomena of history as it unfolds, including those that mark the rise to power and national shame of German fascism.
The second chapter, "The Theory of Phenomenological Description," defends Husserlian phenomenology from Derrida's criticisms and argues that phenomenology recovers classical insight into the being of the form.
(4) However, this essay will reject Husserlian phenomenology as posing an adequate solution to the crisis inaugurated by those sciences that emerged at year 1900.
Seifrid traces Shpet's efforts to construct an "ontology of the self" that would defend it not only against materialism and positivism but also against transcendental forms of idealism (such as neo-Kantianism and Husserlian phenomenology itself).
One is that Husserlian phenomenology assumes no stasis to inquiry in any field relating to human action (and, in complementary fashion, neither does critical realism); since Being is dynamic, the examination of Being does not have an end where all is known.
Since the point of interest here is not how the overcoming of the Husserlian phenomenology is made, in Ricoeur's vision, attitudes, as "the feeling of absolute dependency", "the feeling of complete trust with no exception, in spite of everything, in spite of suffering and evil", "the ultimate preoccupation" etc., comply with a phenomenological description, with the specification that there are "absolute feelings, ab-solute, that is untied to the relations through which the subject remains connected to the object that is considered religious, to the meaning of this supposed object" (55).