Huttonian


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Hut`to´ni`an


a.1.Relating to what is now called the Plutonic theory of the earth, first advanced by Dr. James Hutton.
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, published 1913 by G. & C. Merriam Co.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Mont Blanc's Mysterious Voice: Shelley and Huttonian Earth Science." In The Third Culture: Literature and Science, edited by Elinor S.
(58.) Nigel Leask, "Mont Blanc's Mysterious Voice: Shelley and Huttonian Earth Science," in The Third Culture: Literature and Science, ed.
John Playfair elegantly articulated the idea of unconformity in his 1802 Illustration of the Huttonian Theory of the Earth.
The principle of Huttonian uniformism stated that the mountains periodically crumble by erosion and get into the sea, where they constitute the mass of the future mountains.
In the history of geology the year 1802 saw the publication of John Playfair's Illustrations of the Huttonian Theory of the Earth which had a greater influence on opinion than the publication in 1795 of James Hutton's Theory of the Earth putting the theory on the map, so to speak, of public knowledge (Repcheck 2003).
As mentioned above, even though Coleridge had fundamental differences with the Huttonian theory in terms of either divine or secular causation of the earthly changes, he seems to be presenting a complex poetical vision of the wrestling ideas of both Burnet and Hutton in Kubla Khan.
For the Romantics' involvement see Nigel Leask, "Mont Blanc's Mysterious Voice: Shelley and Huttonian Earth Science," in The Third Culture: Literature and Science, ed.
Similarly, in Act IV, Mephisto presents the `devilish' Huttonian view, summarized as `deranged convulsions', whereas the Neptunist position is defended by Faust and characterized by a string of positive attributes, such as `noble' and `pure'.(40) Goethe's dislike of the Volcanists stemmed from his ideological distrust of all sudden change.